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  1. #1

    How many MEGS are in 15 GB?

    well this is a stupid question, but I'm not very good with math. I have 15GB bandwidth, and just wanted to know how many Megs this is? Is it 150 megs?

  2. #2

  3. #3
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    Re: How many MEGS are in 15 GB?

    Originally posted by melian9102
    well this is a stupid question, but I'm not very good with math. I have 15GB bandwidth, and just wanted to know how many Megs this is? Is it 150 megs?
    Without being all technical with the 1024 bytes, etc...


    Kilo = 1 thousand (1,000 bytes)
    Mega = 1 million (1,000 kilobytes)
    Giga = 1 billion (1,000 megabytes)

    so 15 GB = 15,000 MB

    (again I'm not being technical with the 1024 bytes = kilo)
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  4. #4
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    Re: Re: How many MEGS are in 15 GB?

    Originally posted by Nich
    Without being all technical with the 1024 bytes, etc...


    Kilo = 1 thousand (1,000 bytes)
    Mega = 1 million (1,000 kilobytes)
    Giga = 1 billion (1,000 megabytes)

    so 15 GB = 15,000 MB

    (again I'm not being technical with the 1024 bytes = kilo)
    Most hosts as well as HDD manufacturers use 1000 now anyway just so they can oversell so I think your comparison is fairly good.

  5. #5
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    Google can help with this. Go to google and type in 'MB in 15 GB' and you'll get 15360 as EH-Stevo said. Just another useful feature.

  6. #6
    if you dont have a calculator on hand, just memorize 1,000 mb = 1 gb

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by robbydweb
    if you dont have a calculator on hand, just memorize 1,000 mb = 1 gb
    Is doing 15x24 in your head that hard? Takes me all of like 2-3 seconds, so it can't take that long for people not good in math.

    Pretty simple really, just break it into pieces...

    10x24 .... I mean seriously who can't do this one quickly?
    5x24 ... after doing the one above, it really shouldn't be hard to do this one.
    Add them together what do you get? 360.

    So the point being, why not use the proper 1024 when your dealing with bytes instead of propogating the lies that the HD manufacturers want you to believe?
    Jeremy Johnstone
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  8. #8
    Originally posted by Jeremy Johnstone
    Is doing 15x24 in your head that hard? Takes me all of like 2-3 seconds, so it can't take that long for people not good in math.

    Pretty simple really, just break it into pieces...

    10x24 .... I mean seriously who can't do this one quickly?
    5x24 ... after doing the one above, it really shouldn't be hard to do this one.
    Add them together what do you get? 360.

    So the point being, why not use the proper 1024 when your dealing with bytes instead of propogating the lies that the HD manufacturers want you to believe?
    LOL!! thanks for the math lesson but i think i will keep to 1000mb=1gb. My brain hurts just thinking of not using my calculator

  9. #9
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    1 KB = 2^10 bytes = 1024 bytes
    1 MB = 2^20 bytes = 1024 KB = 1,048,576 bytes
    1 GB = 2^30 bytes = 2^10 MB = 1024 MB = 1,048,576 KB = 1,073,741,824 bytes

    15 GB = 15x2^30 bytes = 15x2^10 MB = 15,360 MB = 16,106,127,360 bytes

    Last edited by DevilDog; 05-20-2005 at 10:49 AM.
    Rich
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  10. So many replies lol.

    Most companies and hosts use 1GB= 1000MB

  11. #11
    15360 lol would be the answer

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by Jeremy Johnstone
    Is doing 15x24 in your head that hard? Takes me all of like 2-3 seconds, so it can't take that long for people not good in math.

    Pretty simple really, just break it into pieces...

    10x24 .... I mean seriously who can't do this one quickly?
    5x24 ... after doing the one above, it really shouldn't be hard to do this one.
    Add them together what do you get? 360.

    So the point being, why not use the proper 1024 when your dealing with bytes instead of propogating the lies that the HD manufacturers want you to believe?

    ok.. umm.. thanks.. I guess.... *most* people just round-up or round-down.. we all can't be hens now can we
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  13. #13
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    2^10 = 1024

    That's how they get it.

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