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  1. #1

    Help me with my U.S. History Survey :)

    I need a couple of people to answer these questions. If you do not want to answer in the thread, please email me your answers to [email protected].
    Thank you!

    Your age/age group: ____

    Do you believe racism still exists in America today? If so, which nationalities are most affected?

    In your opinion, do you think when Americans call themselves Mexican-American, African-American, etc., does the hyphenating bring us closer as a nation or divide us as a nation?

    How are Americanís attitudes about racism different today than they were in the mid 1960ís?

    Thank you again, I owe you one!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    North of some border
    Posts
    5,589

    Re: Help me with my U.S. History Survey :)

    Originally posted by kodek

    >> Your age/age group: ____

    Old enough to remember the Beatles, but not old enough to remember the JFK assassination.

    >> Do you believe racism still exists in America today?

    Yes. It exists in every country.

    >> If so, which nationalities are most affected?

    I can't answer "most," but my Mexican students (I teach English as a Second Language part-time) tell me that they experience racist attitudes in the US, which is one reason that they choose not to study there.

    >> In your opinion, do you think when Americans call themselves Mexican-American, African-American, etc., does the hyphenating bring us closer as a nation or divide us as a nation?

    First, I'm not "us." I'm just getting the ball rolling for you. I don't thinking the hyphenating does either of the above.

    Going off on a tangent, US culture is described as a melting pot, while Canadian culture is described as a mosaic. Both of our countries have mostly immigrants and descendants of immigrants. Here in Canada, we see people's ethnic backgrounds as something that enriches us as a society. That's the theory, but the counter argument is that we make it too easy for immigrants not to become part of Canadian society.

    I'm interested in what Americans think of the above question.

    >> How are Americanís attitudes about racism different today than they were in the mid 1960ís?

    IMO black/white relations have always been more complicated in the US than in Canada because of the US history of slavery. Also, your sharing your border with Mexico means that you have more Mexicans in your country, sometimes illegally = another prominent target for those with racist tendencies. Aside from that, I think the issue of racism is similar in both countries. It's less obvious now because it isn't PC and we have laws to (try to) protect against racism, but racism still exists to a lesser degree. The attitudes are more hidden now, though.

    I see racism as less of a problem with younger people, who haven't grown up with the openly racist attitudes that the older generations did.

    I doubt we'll ever be free of racism. If we didn't have racism, some people would find ear shape or something to use to make them feel superior to some other people. That's (sigh) an aspect of human nature.

    Lois
    Do you have a WHT question or concern? Please open a helpdesk ticket.

    "Do what you can, where you are, with what you have." Ė Theodore Roosevelt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Duluth MN
    Posts
    3,864
    >>Your age/age group:

    I'm 22

    >>Do you believe racism still exists in America today? If so, which nationalities are most affected?

    Yes, racism happens still, I'm not sure which is most affected, but all are affected, either through direct discrimination, or indirect reverse discriminiation.

    >>In your opinion, do you think when Americans call themselves Mexican-American, African-American, etc., does the hyphenating bring us closer as a nation or divide us as a nation?

    I think they divide. We are all "American" just plain old "American". If you call yourself African-American, then you are classifying yourself as different from myself, and opening yourself up to racism. A black person is no more african-american than I am Swedish-American. Same goes for people of latino or asian ethnicity.

    >>How are Americanís attitudes about racism different today than they were in the mid 1960ís?

    Today, you are considered a racist if you believe people should be judged on personal characteristics and qualities, rather than giving special treatment to those of non-white ethnicity.


    --------

    I'm not racist, ask any of my many ethnic friends. But according to groups like the NAACP (Wouldnt the name "National Association for the Advancement of Colored People" be racist just by title alone?), since I don't think people from a minority ethnic group should receive special treatment, I'm a racist.

    To eliminate racism, we need to eliminate 'race'. If you live in america, you are an american. You may have a different ethnicity, but we are the same nationality.

    All this whole "Celebrate Diversity" stuff is point out that you and I are different. Diversity is fine, but when you start saying "I'm black/latino/asian/etc so I should get special funding for school" and start playing the race card, then you become the racist.

  4. #4
    Thank you all for your replies.

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