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  1. #1

    Mini ITX hardware as low cost dedicated servers?

    Dose anyone use Mini ITX hardware as low cost dedicated servers? I have had a look at multiple hardware suppliers it seems like a fairly low cost alternative. Anyone had any experience with this?

  2. #2
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    It would be nice if you want to squeeze every drop out of your colo space. However, VIA processors are weak compared to Intel and AMD processors. Sure, they don't generate much heat, but even putting two MiniITX mobos in the same case doesn't even beat a lowly entry-level Celeron server. Now, if all you need is just a backup/storage server, a MiniITX board would be perfect.

    So, to un-jumble what I just said, VIA processors are aimed more towards the embedded devices market than the datafarm/server market.

  3. #3
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    as the previous poster noted the via hardware is extermely week. For about $300 you can build a sempron 3000+/512/80gig system that will run circles around the mini-itx system.

    if you really need the space then the mini-itx would be a good solution otherwise a micro-atx setup with standard components would be a better option.

  4. #4
    would you consider using it as a hardware firewall? it seems to meet the needs for lets say a bsd solution runing ipfw.

  5. #5
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    No, not really. If you try to build your own firewall, you'll run the risk of screwing up (locking yourself out, for instance) and it just won't be fun. You'd pay just as much for a true hardware firewall that is optimized for that job and that job only. So basically, all VIA procs are good for, computer-wise, are poor-man's datafarms. And they're not very good at that, either.

  6. #6
    Originally posted by flashwiregsn
    If you try to build your own firewall, you'll run the risk of screwing up (locking yourself out, for instance) and it just won't be fun.
    Maybe im wrong but isnt that ture of most firewalls? For example if you block a telnet port on a Cisco Pix the same could happen.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by interop
    Maybe im wrong but isnt that ture of most firewalls? For example if you block a telnet port on a Cisco Pix the same could happen.
    Well, the safeguard with true hardware firewalls is the fact that it comes (mostly) pre-configured, and you don't have to find the right OS and kernel. I guess what I'm trying to say is that with a preconfigured hardware firewall, you just plug it in, configure it to your network, and you're set. Only the most experienced users should try making their own hardware firewall. With a big company producing them, you at least have some form of support (phone support, etc.).

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