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  #1  
Old 11-22-2004, 06:33 AM
WCHost WCHost is offline
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How many watts do you use for your server?


Well, to operate a server..you must have a power supply. Having it failure is easy, your server probably need more power than it could provide...so could anybody let me know...how many WATTS does your power supply can provide *not the maximum output*

Dual Opteron 242
4x 512MB ECC+REG Ram
2x SATA 7200rpm harddisk
Tyan Motherboard
2x PCI slots used
5x external fans

*No CD-ROM, No Floppy, No AGP

What you expect this would need? 450W or more?

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  #2  
Old 11-22-2004, 10:57 AM
boonchuan boonchuan is offline
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I think 200 W shd be ok for such a config

  #3  
Old 11-22-2004, 01:45 PM
porcupine porcupine is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by boonchuan
I think 200 W shd be ok for such a config
Based on what exactly?

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  #4  
Old 11-22-2004, 02:30 PM
2uantuM 2uantuM is offline
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are you insane, boonchuan??

  #5  
Old 11-22-2004, 03:33 PM
cjhhiv cjhhiv is offline
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I'd never put a 200w in a server. Put at least two 300s in there for the above confi. That way one can support the whole thing.

  #6  
Old 11-22-2004, 03:42 PM
porcupine porcupine is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by cjhhiv
I'd never put a 200w in a server. Put at least two 300s in there for the above confi. That way one can support the whole thing.
How are you going to put 2 x 300w power supplies in a single server?

Problem with asking questions on WHT is you rarely get an educated opinion nowdays. 200W is plenty for *many* servers, just not this configuration. Single P4's running 1-2 drives and no accessories do fine on a 200-250W power supply.

WCHost, check amd.com and other resources for power specs for your chips, assume you never want to run over 70% load on the average PSU, and find some basic specs on drives, mobo, fans, etc. and you can calculate very scientifically, and accurately what you'll need.

I usually do 420-480W power supplies on our dual opterons, without any issues, I'm not positive, but I believe the Opteron cores used somewhere between 85 and 110W of power, but double check that.

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  #7  
Old 11-22-2004, 03:48 PM
robinbalen robinbalen is offline
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How are you going to put 2 x 300w power supplies in a single server?

With a redundant PSU?

But anyway -- we use 300W PSUs for our single P4 servers and 500W PSUs for our Xeon servers. These seem to work pretty well and can handle a pretty hefty configuration (e.g. P4 3GHz Prescott, 2GB RAM, 3ware SATA RAID card and 4x SATA HDDs).

As Myles says above, a lot of people do seem to overestimate their power requirements -- remember in a server you don't have the demanding graphics cards and so on that you'll find in a desktop.

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  #8  
Old 11-22-2004, 03:52 PM
wakkow wakkow is offline
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Not a direct answer to the question, but I recently purchased a meter to measure how much my desktop pc uses. It's an Athlon XP 2600 with 2 hard drives and runs at around 160W when doing everything-intensive stuff. That may help as a gauge.

  #9  
Old 11-22-2004, 03:54 PM
cjhhiv cjhhiv is offline
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I've used 250 watters before and burnt many out. It usually takes 1-2 years, but it happens. Definitely speaking from experience here. Of course, a boat load of servers too. It doesn't happen to all :-)

Chuck

  #10  
Old 11-22-2004, 03:56 PM
porcupine porcupine is offline
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You'd have to be an absolute moron to put a redundant 2x300W PSU in a server that requires > 300W of power (unless it was a 3x300W PSU that stacked the inputs to generate 900W peak, 600W with one disabled, 300W with two disabled).

We have a customer who runs ~3 dozen p4-2.4ghz - p4-3.06ghz servers in 1u chassis with 1-2 drives, and 200W power supplies (supermicro 512LB chassis).

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  #11  
Old 11-22-2004, 04:08 PM
cjhhiv cjhhiv is offline
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Huh? If the server uses 300w it is moronic to put two 300watters in there? If one fails, the other couldn't carry it.

But wakkow is correct. Most boxes only use half the PSU installed.

  #12  
Old 11-22-2004, 08:01 PM
Rob T Rob T is offline
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For a similar config to what you are using, we use a very high quality 350 Watt Power Supply as a minimum. Each of those opteron chips burns off about 90+ watts I believe, so you are eating 180w in CPU alone. Factor in for your drives, motherboard, and other devices, and you are probably pushing 280-300w total. A high quality 350w PSU should handle that with ease and give you some breating room to handle spikes in power draw.

FYI for most of our single cpu servers, we have very good results with 200w PSU's. Single Xeon, Single Opteron, and some higher-end P4's like the 3.2 prescotts we use 300w units in. Duals get 350w+ depending on how many other devices are in the server.

I've used units made by Enhance and by Istar and liked both. I was less impressed with the SPI Sparkle Power units due to their higher amperage draw - they aren't as efficient. That usually only matters if you are in a datacenter environment where power usage is restricted, but that is the case for most of us here, which is why i mentioned it. Your dual opteron board will probably need an EPS power supply, which I doubt you will find in power ratings much under 300w anyway. Find a PSU with active PFC if you can as well, they put out much cleaner power and are generally more efficient.

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  #13  
Old 11-23-2004, 06:33 PM
naidd naidd is offline
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200W, 300W... these are all the maximum ratings on power supplies and do not really indicate actual power consumption/capacity.

I run a number of dual Opteron servers in 1U -- dual 244's, 4GB RAM, and a 4-drive SCSI RAID. Those have a 400W power supply (again, maximum). It comes standard with the Chenbro RM117 case.

Actual power consumption I measured is 1.8 amps at idle at 120 volts, 0.9 amps (obviously) at 240 volts.

  #14  
Old 11-23-2004, 06:35 PM
porcupine porcupine is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by naidd
200W, 300W... these are all the maximum ratings on power supplies and do not really indicate actual power consumption/capacity.

I run a number of dual Opteron servers in 1U -- dual 244's, 4GB RAM, and a 4-drive SCSI RAID. Those have a 400W power supply (again, maximum). It comes standard with the Chenbro RM117 case.

Actual power consumption I measured is 1.8 amps at idle at 120 volts, 0.9 amps (obviously) at 240 volts.
I haven't done any individual measurements, what do you get at a reasonable load thats fairly close to peak (say 10.0 load average), with a good amount of drive activity?

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  #15  
Old 11-23-2004, 06:44 PM
naidd naidd is offline
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It depends a lot on the type of server... and I mean a lot.
(let's see if I remember some approximate numbers)

- Dual Opteron fluctuates 20% between idle and full load (1.8 - 2 amps)
- Dual P3 fluctuates around 20% (1.4 - 1.6 amps).
- Dual Xeon fluctuates around 60% (yes, no mistake). This baby goes up to 2.7 amps at 120 volts.

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