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  1. #1

    going with REDHAT 9 or FREEBSD


  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Well? If you're asking which one to go with, only you can answer that question. They're both based on the Unix standards, and they are fairly similar thanks to FreeBSD's Linux Binary Compatibility Layer. They are different though: which do you have more experience administering? That's how I'd decide which to choose.

  3. #3
    not much knowledge

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Are you getting a control panel?
    Steven Ciaburri | Industry's Best Server Management - Rack911.com
    Software Auditing - 400+ Vulnerabilities Found - Quote @ https://www.RACK911Labs.com
    Fully Managed Dedicated Servers (Las Vegas, New York City, & Amsterdam) (AS62710)
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  5. #5
    plesk 7 is what I have my eye on

    OS Requirements

    Standard configuration of Red Hat® Linux 7.3, or 9.0
    Standard configuration of Red Hat® Enterprise Linux 2.1, or 3 (AS/ES)
    Standard configuration of FreeBSD® 4.9
    Standard configuration of SuSE® Linux 9.0
    Standard configuration of Mandrake® Linux 9.2
    Standard configuration of Fedora Core 1

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    FreeBSD is pretty stable with plesk
    Steven Ciaburri | Industry's Best Server Management - Rack911.com
    Software Auditing - 400+ Vulnerabilities Found - Quote @ https://www.RACK911Labs.com
    Fully Managed Dedicated Servers (Las Vegas, New York City, & Amsterdam) (AS62710)
    FreeBSD & Linux Server Management, Security Auditing, Server Optimization, PCI Compliance

  7. #7
    Logically speaking, it is best to go with the one you are familiar with or else the troubleshooting can be a nightmare unless you opt to have someone manage the machine for you.
    http://www.batchimage.com - Offering Batch Image Processing and TIFF/PDF Software Solutions

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Go with FreeBSD:

    If you know it, great!

    If you don't, learn it! You won't regret it.
    Alex Llera
    Professional Server Management
    FreeBSD|Linux|HSphere|Cpanel|Plesk

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Washington, USA
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    FreeBSD is pretty easy to learn, and some areas are much simpler than RedHat 9.

    Either will be stable, and reliable if maintained properly.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    If I'm not mistaken, FreeBSD has a pretty ingenius ports system too, right? It grabs the source and then compiles it? That could be a selling point of FBSD

    (Source: The FreeBSD handbook at http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO...-overview.html)

  11. #11
    which one is the best 4x or 5x?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    FreeBSD 4.x is the most stable. The 5.x version is still in developement for the most part.

  13. #13
    thank you

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
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    UK
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    yeah the ports system makes some tasks very very easy and there is an app called portupgrade which makes sure you can keep them up to date with ease as well, some stuff in redhat is just ... well messy.

  15. #15
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    freeBSD all the way.

  16. #16
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    I second (third? fourth? fifth?) the vote for FreeBSD 4.x

  17. #17
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    Although I have some test servers running rock solid with 5-current, I would recommend FreeBSD 4.x for production servers at the current time.
    Scott Burns, President
    BQ Internet Corporation
    Remote Rsync and FTP backup solutions
    *** http://www.bqbackup.com/ ***

  18. #18
    FreeBSD of course...! Very stable, reliable, & superior network stack

  19. #19
    It really depends on your needs. Redhat is good if you want compatibility, convenience and (rather) up to date packages. FreeBSD's port system, often touted by supporters as supperior to any package management system is more akin to a automated build system. If it fails, it often fails spectacularly and you should be prepared to look at pages upon pages of build output to find your problem. Otherwise you can use the pre-built packages which are out of date.

    FreeBSD is more Unix-like on the other hand, and you may be more accustomed to it if you come from a Unix background. IPF is way cool though and much easier to manage than iptables and netfilter. I would recommand it if not for its creator (use pf and OpenBSD instead)
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  20. #20
    When I need to set up a machine to host an application if I'm near it or far away - FreeBSD. It's amazing, but the FreeBSD boxes we set up have greater uptime than our linux boxes and we're at 426 days uptime with Linux.
    BEN HALSTED, Developer :: WebGroup Media LLC.
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