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  1. #1
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    * Search Engine optimized!

    I beleive I am now search engine optimized in my main site!

    I have my title with my business name along with the service I offer. I have rich content which mentions a lot of strong words in what we offer. Also I have in the HTML a meta content with all the keywords that the site would appeal to, along with a description tag.

    I will now await the google bot to re-look at my site and hopefully place it at my business name, as even when you type in my business name it doesn't come up until about page 7.
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  2. #2
    apparently google doesnt pay attention to meta tags?

  3. #3
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    Really? Well my site is rich in content and the title says what it does...
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  4. #4
    Yeah, but when you type in something, google shows what the person has in their title.

    Lets say someone has a title like: 2005 ford mustang GT
    and someone searches for: 2005 Mustang

    When the site is displayed it has the title of: 2005 Ford mustang GT and the 2005 mustang in the title would be bold.

    Maybe they just use part of the meta tags like the title?
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  5. #5
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    Originally posted by xtremestang1
    Maybe they just use part of the meta tags like the title?
    They absolutely use the title; it's very important. What's sometimes not clear when people talk about this is what people mean by "meta tags." That is, is the title a meta tag?

    Many people are only referring to elements that have the word 'meta' in them when they use that term: 'meta keywords,' 'meta description,' etc. But others use the term to include anything that's properly placed in the <HEAD> section of the html page... so that would include the title.

    So, people saying that Google doesn't use meta tags in ranking are correct if they are using that first definition.
    Specializing in SEO and PPC management.

  6. #6
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    Scenes, good to hear. But I think there is always more work to be done in terms of optimization. I think it is an ongoing process, which never ends because search engines are always changing

    good luck
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  7. #7
    today i've just come across something very interesting to push yourself up in the rank on google.

    google prefers text on top in your code, by using css positioning, you can easily put all the text, in the code, up high, and the rest at the bottom.

    google Google Likes Text Up Top would give you a good study.

  8. #8
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    do you have any links we can look at to read about it?
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  9. #9
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    Originally posted by kohashi
    do you have any links we can look at to read about it?
    There's not really a lot to read, it's a pretty simple idea and well-known in SEO circles. Using absolute positioning, you can place text in a div located anywhere on a page, regardless of where in the actual html document that text appears.

    This is pretty useful when you have, for example, a menubar at the top of your page or on the left margin, since normally having those things placed in those location will mean that the code for them will be placed in the html document before the body text is.

    But by using CSS you can have that text be the first thing to appear in the body part of the html file, put your menu in that file after it, but position the menu so that appears on the page before the body text does.

    I guess for an article describing it the best place to look would be in a tutorial on CSS and especially on CSS positioning.
    Specializing in SEO and PPC management.

  10. #10
    sorry kohashi...i wasn't clear on where to find the article...

    by using google and search for Google Likes Text Up Top, you'll be able to find it very easily. though, i haven't find this sort of thing to relate to other popular search engines like altavista and the like...? is it only google specific?

    thanks JayC, for the further explanation. ^^

  11. #11
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    thanks guys
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  12. #12
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    Originally posted by ktwilight
    i haven't find this sort of thing to relate to other popular search engines like altavista and the like...? is it only google specific?
    Seems to be helpful with other search engines as well -- but it should be mentioned that it's value for optimization isn't all that huge... it's one technique that can be used but it isn't a magic bullet.

    You also have to weigh the downsides, as with more optimization techniques. In this case, there's a good chance that your page won't display correctly in some browsers when vistors are using tools like page translators, or in the Google cache. So, does the chance that some visitors might not see your page the way you want it presented outweight a small potential ranking benefit?

    By the way, one other reason why this approach is sometimes helpful, besides any ranking value: if your important keyword happens to be both in your body and in a text menu, and the menu appears before the text content in the html file, Google's "snippet" for that search is likely to present your menu instead of text from your copy. So instead of presenting phrases that will prompt people to choose your page of those presented, visitors might just see the stuff from your menu, which seem pretty incomprehensible. If you position the text before the menu, the snippet should pull from it.
    Specializing in SEO and PPC management.

  13. #13
    thanks for your advise. it makes me thinks twice now.

  14. #14
    Nice to hear about your site, but there is much more in optimisation. E.g. what is your pagerank?

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