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  1. #1

    stupid bandwidth question

    i see for colocation bandwidth isnt measured in gig/mo its in mbps

    so what does 1mbps equal in gig? for example the below price quote:
    1-39mbps: $50/mbps

    I dont quite understand how much bandwidth that is... any help?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    995
    1Mbps is approximately 320GB of transfer.
    That isn't any amount of bandwidth. That says that if you use anywhere between 1 and 39Mbps, they will charge you $50 for each Mbps used. I.E. 10Mbps used(Roughly 3200GB) would be $500.
    Sam Machiz / Director, Product Development / Ubersmith
    smachiz[at]ubersmith.com / [direct] 212-812-4194

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    995
    The calculations done are Mbps/8=MB/s, which gets you to Mega Bytes, not bits, then multiply by 60 which gets you MB/minute, *60 again which gets you MB/hour, *24 so you have MB/day, *30 so you have total megabytes per month, then divide by 1024(or 1000 depending if you work for a hard disk manufacturer or not ) to get GByte/month.
    Sam Machiz / Director, Product Development / Ubersmith
    smachiz[at]ubersmith.com / [direct] 212-812-4194

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    1,083
    You need to be aware of the method by which your bill is calculated. Co-lo and dedicated bandwidth is often offered on a "95th-percentile" basis, which means that you can burst to a higher speed that your committed data rate; but if your burst too often, you will be billed more.

    Typical hosting clients see only 58% efficiency when billed by 95th-percentile; so you'll get only about 190GB of actual transfers per 1Mb/s you are billed for, even though your mean, or average, transfer rate may be less than 1Mb/s.
    Jeff at Innovative Network Concepts / 212-981-0607 x8579 / AIM: jeffsw6
    Expert IP network consultation and operation at affordable rates
    95th Percentile Explained Rate-Limiting on Cisco IOS switches

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