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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    654

    IP Address question

    Hi,

    How many different IP addresses are there, and about how many are used... and will there ever run out of ip addresses, and if so what will we do?

    just curious

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    80
    I guess it would be approximately 255*255*255*255 which is approx 4,228,250,625. But then many of them are reserved for special purposes (just think of 127.0.0.1 but that's just 1 among many others). Also yeah they plan on running out of IP addresses so that's why there's IPv6. With IPv6 your IP is of the form:

    xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx

    Where each x is a hexadecimal number. Theoretically that would be

    3.4028236692093846346337460743177e+38

    combinations, but actually I don't know much about IPv6 like what's reserved and how many fields there actually are. I'm sure some people more versed in the matter will be able to give you more accurate information, but that's a start.

    With the world's situation looking like it is now, I guess with IPv6 the world will come to an end before we run out of IP's.

  3. #3
    Here is some infomation to help with the question of How many ip's ? etc

    http://computer.howstuffworks.com/question549.htm

    As far as when they run out . . We have a new version of IP, version 6.
    IPv6 is designed as an evolutionary upgrade to the Internet Protocol and will, in fact, coexist with the older IPv4 for some time. IPv6 is designed to allow the Internet to grow steadily, both in terms of the number of hosts connected and the total amount of data traffic transmitted.
    Datums Internet Solutions, LLC
    Systems Engineering & Managed Hosting Services
    Complex Hosting Consultants

  4. #4
    I don't think 127.0.0.1 is reserved actually. That IP is just configured as a loopback address on all machines. I've never changed my hosts file to something other than that, but I would almost venture to say that there may be someone out there with that address. It's just useless to have because as long as a loopback is set locally, that IP would be inaccessable.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    80
    Search results for: 127.0.0.1


    OrgName: Internet Assigned Numbers Authority
    OrgID: IANA
    Address: 4676 Admiralty Way, Suite 330
    City: Marina del Rey
    StateProv: CA
    PostalCode: 90292-6695
    Country: US

    NetRange: 127.0.0.0 - 127.255.255.255
    CIDR: 127.0.0.0/8
    NetName: LOOPBACK
    NetHandle: NET-127-0-0-0-1
    Parent:
    NetType: IANA Special Use
    Comment: Please see RFC 3330 for additional information.
    RegDate:
    Updated: 2002-10-14

    OrgAbuseHandle: IANA-IP-ARIN
    OrgAbuseName: Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Number
    OrgAbusePhone: +1-310-301-5820
    OrgAbuseEmail: [email protected]

    OrgTechHandle: IANA-IP-ARIN
    OrgTechName: Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Number
    OrgTechPhone: +1-310-301-5820
    OrgTechEmail: [email protected]

    # ARIN WHOIS database, last updated 2004-04-11 19:15
    # Enter ? for additional hints on searching ARIN's WHOIS database.

    *** EDIT ***

    I would've laughed had I seen otherwise

    *** EDIT #2 ***

    Don't eMail [email protected] if you see some attacks from 127.0.0.1

  6. #6
    I would rather not think that far ahead lol

  7. #7
    http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space

    IANA-Reserved is stuff that IANA either hasn't or won't give out.

    RFC's guide the use of IP address space. You can read the whole thing about special use IP addresses here: http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc3330.txt, but if I assume that nobody will and the 127 question will pop up again, here is the relavent text:

    127.0.0.0/8 - This block is assigned for use as the Internet host
    loopback address. A datagram sent by a higher level protocol to an
    address anywhere within this block should loop back inside the host.
    This is ordinarily implemented using only 127.0.0.1/32 for loopback,
    but no addresses within this block should ever appear on any network
    anywhere

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    654
    http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc3330.txt

    <offtopic> Matt Savona, who designed your companies website? i completely love it </offtopic>
    Last edited by Bodeba; 04-12-2004 at 01:26 PM.

  9. #9
    Originally posted by loopforever
    I don't think 127.0.0.1 is reserved actually. That IP is just configured as a loopback address on all machines. I've never changed my hosts file to something other than that, but I would almost venture to say that there may be someone out there with that address. It's just useless to have because as long as a loopback is set locally, that IP would be inaccessable.
    Yes, everyone is out there with that address .
    There are some IP networks which are reserved.
    The ENTIRE 127.x.x.x network is reserved for loopback.
    If you are in windows, you can try 'ping 127.1.2.3' and you will ping your local computer.
    There are other such networks which are reserved too.
    Such as: 169.254.x.x
    Also: 192.168.x.x
    Also: 10.x.x.x

    These are not used as external networks connected to the internet, but rather used as local networks.
    [AIM]: BhAaD99 :: [ICQ]: 79048062 :: [MSN/eMail]: [email protected]

  10. #10
    Originally posted by BhAaD
    Yes, everyone is out there with that address .
    There are some IP networks which are reserved.
    The ENTIRE 127.x.x.x network is reserved for loopback.
    If you are in windows, you can try 'ping 127.1.2.3' and you will ping your local computer.

    These are not used as external networks connected to the internet, but rather used as local networks.
    Interesting . Thanks for sharing your infomation guys.

    Also, Lee - our design is in-house. I designed it myself, thanks for the praise .

  11. #11
    Hi, I am new to this forum, If someone could help me out a bit. I have a dynamic IP address such that each time i connect I have a different IP address. I have heard that e.g. afraid.org can give you subdomains and DNS services so that you can connect to your IP address via that host. But my question is that when my computer reboots or when i re-connect and my IP address changes, how will the host connect to this new IP address? Like that host was directed to my IP lets say 12.34.56.78 but now my IP has changed to 21.31.41.51 so how will the host redirect connections to this new IP address? If this is possible, please tell me how I can set this up. Thanks!

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