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  1. #1

    Say Goodbye to Red Hat Linux 9.0

    I received this in my e-mail a couple days ago:

    "Dear Red Hat Linux user,

    We are approaching the published end of life date for errata support for our final Red Hat Linux distribution. We'd like to remind you of this date and the options available to you for migrating your Red Hat Linux implementations: Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the Fedora Project.

    Red Hat Linux 9 distribution will reach its end-of-life for errata maintenance on April 30, 2004. This means that as of May 1, 2004 we will not be producing new security, bugfix, or enhancement updates for this product.

    There are a variety of options available for migration. Red Hat offers Red Hat Enterprise Linux as well as the new Fedora Project."

    This is going to be a huge budget change for our business plan. I believe the Fedora project is free, however, not as secure or as high performance as enterprise.

    Does anyone else have concerns with this, and have they figured out what they are going to be switching to? I would like to hear what other people are doing.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Progeny will be continuing updates for RH9. $5/mo IIRC.

  4. #4
    What is Progeny, I'm unfamilar with that software.
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
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  5. #5
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  6. #6
    I see. I would rather pay $5/month for updates instead of paying $500 for red hat enterprise which seems to be very flakey with my dual xeon servers.
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
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  7. #7
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    I believe that Fedora is equally as secure and high performance as RedHat 9 is/was. If you are happy using RH9, you should be happy using Fedora as well, in my opinion.
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  8. #8
    What I don't get is why don't just keep Red Hat 9 and get rid of Fedora? What is the point of removing one free software for a new free software?
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
    http://www.comcage.com

  9. #9
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    Basically, they were losing money with the marketing they were doing for RH9, and also no longer wanted to officially support it.

    Fedora is not being officially "boxed-up" and sold in stores (like FreeBSD, and other *NIX distibutions), and that allows them to not have to invest as much money for a product people were really not buying in the first place.

    Fedora is community-driven and developed, and is not an officially supported release of RedHat, Inc.

    They wanted to better concentrate on their enterprise-level software, something that would guarantee them some revenue.
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  10. #10
    I see. Thank you for clearing that up. So instead of RedHat, Inc. creating and selling books in bookstores, it's going to be up to the community, in regards to Fedora.

    I understand that the community is reporting bugs, working on the development and core of the software, and RedHat Inc. is supporting it by making it available for download and giving everyone a centeralized location to operate the project from.

    So basically, my question now is, how secure is Fedora, how often will it be updated for functionality, performance, and security, and how well does it perform with Dual Xeon Servers?
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
    http://www.comcage.com

  11. #11
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    You are very welcome! I am glad I could clear things up for you.

    Originally posted by comcage
    So basically, my question now is, how secure is Fedora, how often will it be updated for functionality, performance, and security, and how well does it perform with Dual Xeon Servers?
    Fedora is equally secure as RH9 was, and is updated just about as often. It still makes use of the up2date program (run on a separate Fedora server) to provide updates as the become available, just as RH9 did.

    Unfortunately I can not help you with the Dual Xeon server question, as I have never run it on them. Hopefully someone else has!
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  12. #12
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    Red Hat's support of Dual Xeons, especially in conjunction with SCSI is pathetic. Not only did they make a hugely unpopular move to their extortionware enterprise, but they didn't even bother to make it actually work with enterprise hardware!

    I haven't bothered with Fedora, but I imagine, being a testbed for RHE that it's more of the same silliness.

  13. #13
    Thank you once again miakeru. If anyone is running Fedora on Dual Xeons, please share your experiences.
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
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  14. #14
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    i am running redhat Ent on 2 servers one with SCSI but i have hyperthreading off because i am told the kernel is still bugy but still i think redhat Ent is the way to go plus why pay $500 for it when you can get it free with and server you rent.
    unless you some privet businse but then you should be able to pay for it

  15. #15
    We don't do dedicated servers. We build our own dual 2.8 xeon systems and ship them out to the planet.
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
    http://www.comcage.com

  16. #16
    Greetings:

    We've worked with a number of RedHat Enterprise servers (single and dual processes); and RedHat Enterprise has been great to work with over time.

    Depending on your application base, you can get away with RedHat Enterprise WS. You can get WS for under $100; and I've heard from some one who got boxed sets at their local Staples store for under $70.

    While we are presently subscribing to progeny as well as using Feodra Legacy (via yum) for security updates to our own pre-enterprise servers, we are in the process of converting over to RedHat Enterprise (in our case, we are going the ES route).

    Thank you.
    ---
    Peter M. Abraham
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  17. #17
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    Originally posted by BizB
    i am running redhat Ent on 2 servers one with SCSI but i have hyperthreading off because i am told the kernel is still bugy but still i think redhat Ent is the way to go plus why pay $500 for it when you can get it free with and server you rent.
    unless you some privet businse but then you should be able to pay for it
    So RHE doesn't work, but it's the way to go?

    Can you explain your use of logic there?

  18. #18
    RedHat Enterprise is working pretty flawless, but we had to upgrade to a non stable release in order for it to function correctly. Furthermore, after the upgrade, our server has had two hard shutdowns of which it didn't come back up online, and had to be manually rebooted at the data facility.
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
    http://www.comcage.com

  19. #19
    Greetings Comcage:

    I believe your experience.

    Ours has been the opposite. The RedHat Enterprise servers we have worked with (mainly in Rackspace.com, and a data center in Canada -- would have to check which one) over the past several months has been a dream for the most part.

    The only trouble we ran into is that Sun Microsystems does not have support for ChiliSoft ASP on RedHat Enterprise.

    Thank you.
    ---
    Peter M. Abraham
    LinkedIn Profile

  20. #20
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    What about White Box Enterprise Linux (WBEL) as a possible option. Basically RHEL but with different labeling. Check it out at http://www.whiteboxlinux.org/

    This product is derived from the Free/Open Source Software made available by Red Hat, Inc but IS NOT produced, maintained or supported by Red Hat. Specifically, this product is forked from the source code for Red Hat's _Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3_ product under the terms and conditions of it's EULA.
    Glen Millar
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  21. #21
    Doesn't look like cpanel supports white box. It's not listed on their main page under supported O/S'es. Also, as the questions go.... how secure, how fast, how often is it updated, how often is security updated, how often is bugs fixed, how often is the kernel updated, is it good with dual xeons?
    Jon Rhoads, [email protected]
    http://www.comcage.com

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