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  1. #1

    110 was blocked, how can I receive email?

    My ISP blocked ports 80, 110, 25. I was using Imail server to receive and send my own email with my domain name. Although port 25 has been blocked, I've figured out and no problem to send email. But how to receive email is still a problem for me?

    I don't know if there is a way I can using other port to receive email. If you know it, please tell me. Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    England
    Posts
    819
    they blocked port 80? is this an April Fools joke???

    Andrew
    NetHosted - UK based hosting solutions.

  3. #3
    Originally posted by NetHosted
    they blocked port 80? is this an April Fools joke???

    Andrew
    Their purpose is preventing regular users have their own website, email server ..... But this really turns me off!

  4. #4
    Turns you off? How can anyone run a webhosting company that blocks port 80? Thats the port that most browsers look for... Id get a new host... now, sooner than later

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    632
    His ISP blocked it, not his web host. He's hosting an email server from his own computer.

    Personally, I don't think there's much you can do. Any server incoming to you is going to try those ports, and you can't force them to use another port. Your hands are tied unless you switch ISPs.
    Former owner of A Small Orange
    New owner of <COMING SOON>

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,305
    Port 26 is an alt for stmp

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Above The Clouds
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    6,999
    As opposed to port 25 for smtp. Have to try out this new protocol.
    Laurence Flynn @ atOmicVPS LTD
    Linux & Windows Cloud Hosting Solutions Powered by OnApp
    Fully Managed [Shared][Reseller][Cloud VPS] [Dedicated]
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  8. #8
    Originally posted by NexDog
    As opposed to port 25 for smtp. Have to try out this new protocol.
    I checked it out already, it's Super Tricky Mail Protocol designed especially to trick those mean ISPs....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Above The Clouds
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    6,999
    Damn, that's funny.
    Laurence Flynn @ atOmicVPS LTD
    Linux & Windows Cloud Hosting Solutions Powered by OnApp
    Fully Managed [Shared][Reseller][Cloud VPS] [Dedicated]
    Featuring the atOmicSTACK ● Speed ● Performance ● Reliability

  10. #10
    Like what I said, I can bypass my PC port 25 and used ISP's server's 25 port to send email. but seems no way to make POP3 work.

    Yes, I'm considering to change an ISP.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    80
    Wow if you've got incomming SMTP solved you've definitely figured out the hard part.

    If I understand correctly your ISP has also blocked incomming ports 110 and 80. This can be worked around.

    Incomming port 110 is of course the port normally used for outside email clients to check and retrieve mail from their POP3 mailbox.

    Depending on the server you use, however, you can set the server software to listen to another port other than port 110. For example, you could have it listen to port 3110.

    Then your outside email clients would need to configure their client to use port 3110 for POP3. This is usually on the advanced tab in microsoft outlook.

    Most people paying for domain hosting would not put up with this requirement from a domain host, but if you're just hosting for your own outside access, or for just a few friends or family, this is a workable workaround.

    If I misunderstood your question, sorry to ramble.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    80

    about incomming SMTP

    Well sorry but having read more carefully it seems you are trying to figure out how you can receive incomming messages from other mail servers. These would be coming in via SMTP on port 25, which I think you are saying is blocked.

    I can only think of 1 way around that: find a friendly domain host you can set your MX record to, who will initially receive all your mail for you and then forward it to your server using an alternate port.

    We do this for several clients through VPN connections so that they can receive mail via regular SMTP, while their server sits safely behind a firewall. But it wouldn't have to be done via a VPN. It could just be done using another port.

    Tom

  13. #13

    Re: about incomming SMTP

    Originally posted by dynamis
    Well sorry but having read more carefully it seems you are trying to figure out how you can receive incomming messages from other mail servers. These would be coming in via SMTP on port 25, which I think you are saying is blocked.

    I can only think of 1 way around that: find a friendly domain host you can set your MX record to, who will initially receive all your mail for you and then forward it to your server using an alternate port.

    We do this for several clients through VPN connections so that they can receive mail via regular SMTP, while their server sits safely behind a firewall. But it wouldn't have to be done via a VPN. It could just be done using another port.

    Tom
    Yes, that's the only way I'm thinking about. Cause i'm using Imail Server, seems I didn't find any way to change POP3 ports. Anyway, I'm gonna change ISP shortly.

    Thank you guys!

  14. #14
    Or you can have your "Yahoo" account retrieve your email via pop. It's somewhere in the preferences. BTW who is your ISP?
    Datums Internet Solutions, LLC
    Systems Engineering & Managed Hosting Services
    Complex Hosting Consultants

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    5,403
    Well if you have a choice switch ISP's but keep in mind your average $49.99 (give or take) per month cable modem is to be used for personal use only and if you read the TOS I suspect most any ISP has it against their TOS to run your own server.

    My last ISP allowed you to have 1 static ip and 5 dynamics and let you run servers for $99 per month, that was quite nifty actually and I gladly paid it, my current ISP offers a business plan but (GET THIS) they DO NOT let you run servers, I got pissy with the sales guy and was like "how the fsck can you call it a business plan when I can't do any BUSINESS on the damned service?".

    Anyway if you're not paying for business class service (running a mail server where outside connections happen would constitute business class to me) then be ready for any isp you use to cut you off if they notice it.
    Gary Harris - the artist formerly known as Dixiesys
    resident grumpy redneck

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3,084
    I believe you can find a network wrapper -- it runs on a different port, but just passes requests to port 110 locally.
    Jim Reardon - jim/amusive.com

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    1,652
    Id check your TOS/AUP with your ISP first. It's prolly against it if they are blocking you. If its against it, then they have every right to block those ports (if you are abusing), or just cut off your service (which is what charter cable will do).
    Happily hosting @ Dathorn.com (Since 3/2003), Ispeeds.net (Since 2004), & Quadspeedi.net (Since 7/2005)!
    Hosted @ FDC for 9 Years

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