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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    15

    Linux + ASP, JSP, ColdFusion

    Hey guys,

    I've been running a server for about a month or so now. My server OS is Redhat Linux Enterprise 3.0 ES and I have the usual webserver install, Apache, PHP, mySQL and so on. I was wondering how reliable ASP, JSP, and/or Cold Fusion are on a Redhat server? Are there known issues, and are there specific requirements needed.

    I would like to know this because I would like to introduce some new features on my hosting plans, help would be very much appreciated.

    -- Thanks
    Bordernode Networks: Limitless Possibilities
    Xen HVM VPS: Linux, Windows, BSD, Solaris
    Follow us on Twitter: @Bordernode

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Granville OH
    Posts
    108
    ASP is fairly windows centric... so I'm not sure I'd try it. JSP is nice and powerful, but can be a pain to setup and integration into your existing apache setup can be tricky. I would probably only go JSP if you're going to use JSP for everything. I have no experience with cold fusion, but my guess would be that it too is windows centric.

    On a linux machine you can use CGI pretty easily, I would try looking into perl or python and how to use cgi with whichever language you prefer. That way you can keep using apache and keep all of your existing content.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    15
    Hmm,

    I already have Apache, PHP, CGI, and Perl installed on the server. I was looking into expanding my services into JSP and ASP, but I heard that the ASP module for Apache is unstable. I'll look into JSP and see how well it integrates with Linux and Apache.

    -- Thanks
    Bordernode Networks: Limitless Possibilities
    Xen HVM VPS: Linux, Windows, BSD, Solaris
    Follow us on Twitter: @Bordernode

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kuwait
    Posts
    5,099
    For JSP, you will need to install Tomcat.

    You can then setup Apache to redirect all .jsp requests to Tomcat.

    Goes without saying you'll need a JVM installed.

    The setup of Tomcat is not a big issue on Linux in general -- but if you are using some control panel package that installs apache/php/etc for you, then it can be a big hassle to make everything play with each other.

    Coldfusion is an application server. Afaik, there is no Linux equivalent of it.
    In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.
    If you feel like it, you can read my blog
    Signal > Noise

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    772
    Hi,

    JSP is more reliable. For using JSP on linux sever you will need to have JVM(Java Virtual Machine) installed on your server. ColdFusion restricts any third-party functions as an addition. It's scripting language is primitive and does not support standard operator syntax or user-defined functions. For ASP, you have to use chilisoft ASP.

    Regards,

    Bright

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    15
    Awesome, thanks for the information guys I'll look into all of these.

    Really appreciate it,
    - John
    Bordernode Networks: Limitless Possibilities
    Xen HVM VPS: Linux, Windows, BSD, Solaris
    Follow us on Twitter: @Bordernode

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth
    Posts
    429
    First of all, you do NOT have to install Tomcat to run JSP. There are OTHER servlet engines, notably Resin.

    And ColdFusion is NOT necessarily "windows-centric". And as a matter of fact, a good choice if you'd like to offer both JSP & ColdFusion is Macromedia JRun: one application enables both technologies.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth
    Posts
    429
    Originally posted by Brightadmin

    <snip>
    ColdFusion ... does not support ... user-defined functions.
    WRONG. When was the last time you used ColdFusion? Do you know diddly about ColdFusion MX?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    5
    For JSP try Tomcat or Resin.

    There is detailed documentation on how to configure Tomcat with Apache on Tomcat's page.

    jakarta.apache.org/tomcat/

    Good luck.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    61
    We have coldfusion mx running on a redhat 9 server without problems.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    522
    For JSP, and if you're crazy enough, you can also try Jetty (http://jetty.mortbay.org/). Works very well on older, slower machines. I don't know if it's stable and reliable enough to be used in production, though. We use it exclusively on our test server.
    Nokhrin - http://www.nokhrin.com/
    ~ e-commerce application development

  12. #12
    Jetty is the web server/servlet container that comes bundled with JBoss and seems to be a stable product. JBoss has a huge market share for open source J2EE application servers, so I wouldnt be too concerned with Jetty. Other apache products use it as well.

    As for JRun, I would avoid it. Depending on the services you want to offer, you could be opening yourself up to high ticket counts for features you dont really want to offer. While the servlet engine performs well, JRun has some performance issues with the default JMS server and Message Driven Beans. In fact, on a prior dev effort, we brought it to its knees.

    If you are only after servlets and JSPs, something like tomcat is a better choice. Otherwise, fingers could be pointing to poor performing machines when in fact the application server isnt mature enough in some areas. Besides, most coders putting up a simple website probably wouldnt require the power of a full app server. If they did, they would probably want to put it on their own box.

    While I am a developer (J2EE), not a sys admin, I couldnt imagine running an app server in a shared hosting environment without some serious effort (permissions on naming trees used by EJBs for example)
    Rodney McCabe
    Vestals Gap Consulting, LLC
    www.vestalsgap.com

  13. #13
    You can get ColdFusion for RHEL, but I think you have to pay to have a license for it. Go to Macromedia's website, it will have some information on it.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    74
    i have installed CFMX on some redhat servers, it is expensive ($1200 USD for the linux server)

  15. #15
    Originally posted by jb4mt
    WRONG. When was the last time you used ColdFusion? Do you know diddly about ColdFusion MX?
    Ofcoarse coldfusions supports user defined functions. That guy is nutz.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    89
    Installing JSP support:

    1. install the Sun j2sdk (at the moment 1.4.2_05 or 1.5) available from the Sun website
    2. install Jetty, available from the Jetty website
    3. start jetty by writing 'java -jar start.jar'
    4. voila, there's your JSP support

    5. if you want to do production serving, you probably want to tailor the etc/jetty.xml for your specific needs, also your init script should be configured to give the JVM the amount of memory you want to grant it

    6. you probably want to set up a init script which restarts Jetty when the server restarts

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