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  1. #1

    What are the catches?

    I'm intrested in getting a domain that is going to expiring on sunday, but the services like snapnames and such are already taken, What are the chances that I can catch this by hand? Also Is it possible to make sure that is is going to expire when I think it is? Or can some one help me snap it up.

    Thanks,
    Joseph Blossom

  2. #2
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    Nearly impossible or else we would all be trying to catch by hand. Many of the popular names are re-registered electronically within seconds of dropping.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    seconds? haha, they get caught before you blink.

    if it were 2 seconds an API chaser would have a fighting chance, but it more like 1/1000 of a second for good names at least the way these registrars all hammer at the same time.

    try www.pool.com, www.namewinner.com those are going to be your best bet.

    As for when it expires: www.freewho.com/checker will give you the date.
    Kevin Ohashi - Founder of ReviewSignal.com - Honest Web Hosting Reviews
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  4. #4
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    Re: What are the catches?

    Originally posted by Hosemeyer
    I'm intrested in getting a domain that is going to expiring on sunday, but the services like snapnames and such are already taken, What are the chances that I can catch this by hand? ... Or can some one help me snap it up.
    With SnapNames AND other drop-catching services ordered, I don't think you'll have even the slightest chance of registering by hand. But are you sure they're all taken?

    By the way, if that is a hot name, the cost of getting it (esp. with the bidding systems at many venues) would probably go way up.
    Co-Founder @HostHideout. Profoundly influenced by #Bauhaus, @Nameslave unrepentantly embraces #Minimalism with a bias for functionality, color theory and pixel precision: a #multimedia messenger in the McLuhan sense. His totally irrelevant M.Ed. dissertation examines Organizational Culture and Change Management. He also likes Patrik Ervell, Wong Kar-wai and IKEA.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    5,400
    There is no chance at all to beat the drop services
    Domain Maven

  6. #6
    I'm not sure if it is truely that popular of a name for everyone to be hoping on to it. Yes, I believe both godaddy's services and SnapNames are gone.

    Is it possible to create something with php that could snatch names? LIke if it was on a webserver that was up nearly 100%? And if so, what would I have to tap into for it to "snap" them up?

  7. #7
    You're not going to be able to compete with companies like Pool.com if its even a moderately hot domain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    37
    Hosemeyer, you are not going to beat the pro's.

    Don't even get your hopes' up.

    At this late date, the only opinion you have is Pool and Namewinner.

    I hope you get it. But, be willing to pay.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    248
    Is there a difference in the likelyhood of getting the name between the different companies? godaddy charges $19 and pool.com charges $60 if there is no auction. Is there any advantage to offering the $60 to pool.com?

    The name I want is coming due in November. To give you an idea of the popularity, it's in the hands of a profitier (I got flamed for using the name squatter, and I don't know what the accepted term here is) who is asking around $200 for it, so it shouldn't be hotly fought over.

    Before anyone says to just pay the $200, I will not pay it to a profitier just on principle; I'd rather not have the name.

    I will be using one of the services to try and grab it, I just want to know if I'm better off with any one over another or I should just go with the cheapest price.

  10. #10
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    Sep 2003
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    Socrat - your assuming the "profitier" is going to let it drop. You already showed that you are interested he or she just may keep it. Godaddy is a waste of $18, I know I have spent money there and wished they offered a refund.

    I think everyone here would agree that either you use all the services and be prepared to spend the cash because some of the auction houses pull some serious bids, or you can get down off the horse and pony up the cash for a name you could have today.

    I'm not saying I don't agree with you because I kinda do. The most money I have ever spent on a domain is less than $150. But the facts are just that.

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by Socrat
    The name I want is coming due in November. To give you an idea of the popularity, it's in the hands of a profitier (I got flamed for using the name squatter, and I don't know what the accepted term here is) who is asking around $200 for it, so it shouldn't be hotly fought over.

    Before anyone says to just pay the $200, I will not pay it to a profitier just on principle; I'd rather not have the name.
    If you could afford not having the name, yes, then don't pay extra to get it. The truth is you are very likely to pay much more than just the minimum bidding price, even when it's not one of those "hotties" that go in the thousands or even 5-figure. These days, just every other name gets a bid of $100+. Okay, I may be a bit exaggerated, but if you are thinking of grabbing it for like $20, there's a good chance that you might just be able to register it by hand.

    By the way, people who buy low and sell high are usually called "investors".
    Co-Founder @HostHideout. Profoundly influenced by #Bauhaus, @Nameslave unrepentantly embraces #Minimalism with a bias for functionality, color theory and pixel precision: a #multimedia messenger in the McLuhan sense. His totally irrelevant M.Ed. dissertation examines Organizational Culture and Change Management. He also likes Patrik Ervell, Wong Kar-wai and IKEA.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    248
    Originally posted by nameslave
    If you could afford not having the name, yes, then don't pay extra to get it. The truth is you are very likely to pay much more than just the minimum bidding price, even when it's not one of those "hotties" that go in the thousands or even 5-figure. These days, just every other name gets a bid of $100+. Okay, I may be a bit exaggerated, but if you are thinking of grabbing it for like $20, there's a good chance that you might just be able to register it by hand.

    By the way, people who buy low and sell high are usually called "investors".
    If the name is only worth $200 on the open market, how can an investor spend even $60 much less $100+ to grab it from a service like pool.com. It is fairly obscure, I only want it because I run a site that it's a better name for than the one I have. I've even seen people link to my site but put the name I'd like to get as in the description. As far as I can tell, nobody else runs a similar site.

    I think the only real risks are the current person renewing or another investor picking it up for the base registration price before I can. Why would he pay the $8 for another year if he's already had it for 2 years and couldn't even get $200 for it?

    With such a low value, I don't think I have to worry about investors competing over it.


    Originally posted by nameslave
    Socrat - your assuming the "profitier" is going to let it drop. You already showed that you are interested he or she just may keep it. Godaddy is a waste of $18, I know I have spent money there and wished they offered a refund.

    I think everyone here would agree that either you use all the services and be prepared to spend the cash because some of the auction houses pull some serious bids, or you can get down off the horse and pony up the cash for a name you could have today.

    I'm not saying I don't agree with you because I kinda do. The most money I have ever spent on a domain is less than $150. But the facts are just that.
    Is Godaddy a waste because it's faster to do it by hand or they'll get it in a few seconds while the others will do it in a 1000th of a second?

    The only interest I showed to the investor is in visiting the domain once six months ago and I saw his price. I've been avoiding going there since for that exact reason.

    Thanks for your input,
    Jason

  13. #13
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    Hey Jason, you have "misquoted" me: the second quotes actually comes from acts837.
    Co-Founder @HostHideout. Profoundly influenced by #Bauhaus, @Nameslave unrepentantly embraces #Minimalism with a bias for functionality, color theory and pixel precision: a #multimedia messenger in the McLuhan sense. His totally irrelevant M.Ed. dissertation examines Organizational Culture and Change Management. He also likes Patrik Ervell, Wong Kar-wai and IKEA.

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Originally posted by nameslave
    Hey Jason, you have "misquoted" me: the second quotes actually comes from acts837.
    Sorry about that...I cut and pasted the quote code, I meant to change it, but obviously I forgot.

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    Bashar Al-Abdulhadi - KuwaitNET Internet Services Serving customers since 1997
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