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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Colo Spgs, CO
    Posts
    32
    Currently I run a website, at Communitech, website that manages fantasy football leagues. This is a MySQL, PHP intensive site. For each page, at least 2 queries are required to obtain the proper data for the page, sometimes more. Most of these queries I can do from my telnet in less then a second (just to give you an idea of the query speed).
    Anyway, I require about 100MB of transfer per month per league and next year I am thinking of advertising heavily and may get around 200 leagues. That puts me at about 20GB transfer per month. I am not too concerned about the amount of transfer I am expecting as much as the number of simultaneous processes.
    I will have about 2000 active users. These users will do 80% of their team administration Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday during the months from September thru December. What, if any, should my concerns be about simultaneous processes? Also, if I decide to go to a dedicated server, for my single site, what question should I be asking?
    Do I need 256MB RAM or is 64MB enough?
    Can I get by with 128 KB cache?
    Is a 566 MHz Celeron ok, or do I need to stick with Intel?
    Is a 15GB ATA/66 hard drive ok?
    Answers to any or all of these questions will be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    I personally think that 64 ram is definately not enough. If your site ever reacha certain usage, you will need 256 RAM to keep your server up and fast.

    Your Celeron is a good choice, it is much cheaper than XEON Intel for example and will still do great for you.

    If you transfer huge files, you should consider a 20MB SCSI hard drive, 1mb cache or similar... Else, I think that what you stated above is fine for your needs.

    You will mainly use the RAM and the cpu... so make sure that you can upgrade the RAM to 512 if the needs appears.

    For 20gb per month it is not dangerous... but if you raise to... 50+, the ram become critical.
    Félix C.Courtemanche · webmaster@can-host.com
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Not here
    Posts
    1,437
    stat_man,

    While not directly relevant to your question, you should be aware that Communitech has apparently been grossly inflating the bandwidth usage to many of their customers in an attempt to get them to move to a dedicated server. I mention this because your estimated usage would certainly put you into the range they would likely target.

    There are at least two discussions here of people who did move elsewher and found their actual usage far less (less than a third in one case) of what Communitech had told them they were using.

    As to your technical questions, Felix has already answered them, and I largely agree.

    Originally posted by stat_man
    Do I need 256MB RAM or is 64MB enough?
    Can I get by with 128 KB cache?
    Is a 566 MHz Celeron ok, or do I need to stick with Intel?
    Is a 15GB ATA/66 hard drive ok?
    Answers to any or all of these questions will be greatly appreciated.
    You can't have too much RAM, and you should have more than 64 mb. Upgrading to 256 mb is better, or at least 128 mb. Keep in mind that with set up fees, the difference between upgrading to 256 instead of 128 may be minimal. In other words, if you upgrade to 128 and pay a setup fee, and later upgrade to 256 and pay another set up fee, it may have ended up cheaper or not much less to have just upgraded to 256 mb and pay a single set up fee. Similar benefits apply in moving to 512 mb.

    A Celeron processor is made by Intel. You're either thinking of AMD or other manufacturers, or other Intel processors (like P3s, Xeons, or P4s).

    With sufficient RAM, your choices will likely be sufficient for your needs. Modern SCSI drives are faster than EIDE drives, and P3s have advantages over Celerons, but the difference is likely to be minimal in your case and hardly critical, as with many businesses.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    917
    Hi Stat_Man,

    I posted this reply to the same question at scriptkeeper so I'll post it here just in case you didn't see it:

    1st, the more RAM the better. I would start out with a minum of 128 megs.
    2nd, hard drive size depends on how much space you will need. But 15 gb seems like plenty to me

    3rd, Celeron 566 would most definitely do the job, but a PIII is always better. I have a celeron in my server and I have no complaints.

    4th, The more ram you have the less time your server will be wasting swapping processes back and forth. So if you anticipate on having a lot of processes running concurrently then make sure you have a lot of ram or your server will be slow as molasses.

    5th, good dedicated server companies that I would recommend are:

    Dialoneinternet.com
    VDI
    Catalog.com
    Rackspace
    Tera-byte
    servint.com

    I only have personal experience with dialtone but I have heard good things about the others.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    731

    Blah

    Originally posted by Félix C.Courtemanche


    If you transfer huge files, you should consider a 20MB SCSI hard drive, 1mb cache or similar... Else, I think that what you stated above is fine for your needs.
    20MB SCSI?

    Though the difference between a 566 Celeron 2 and a 600mhz Pentium 3 was almost 40%...I'd just get a Pentium to be safe.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    917
    Where did you get your information regarding the Celeron and P3? I don't think the difference is anywhere close to %40. From all the benchmarks I have seen, there is at most a %15-20 difference at the same clock speed, depending on the application and benchmark of course.

    [Edited by tabernack on 09-16-2000 at 01:38 PM]

  7. #7

    Re: Blah

    Originally posted by fibroptikl
    20MB SCSI?
    Consider SCSI as a high-class HD, faster, more stable, etc.
    Félix C.Courtemanche · webmaster@can-host.com
    Can-Host Networks · http://www.can-host.com
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