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  1. #1
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    Announce ipv4 allocated by ARIN under ASN provided by APNIC

    Kindly clarify two things as follows:
    1. can we announce IPv4 allocated by ARIN under ASN provided by APNIC ? If yes then any other configuration is required ?

    2. Can we announce same IPV4 block using seperate BGP session under two ASN simultaneously ?

    Kindly share your practical experience.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by randhir View Post
    Kindly clarify two things as follows:
    1. can we announce IPv4 allocated by ARIN under ASN provided by APNIC ? If yes then any other configuration is required ?
    Technically you could, but presumably you'd then be announcing the ARIN IPv4 block outside the ARIN region. For the last while, ARIN has required that their blocks be announced within their region, and they have required attestation to such, so you would be in violation of their policy and your agreements with them. There's the possibility of them reclaiming the block; I have never seen this happen in practice myself, but I do not know that this does not happen. With IPv4 running out and ARIN being the only registry with IPv4 space remaining, they may become more strict with their policy and start enforcing it more though, so it could become a more common occurrence.

    Quote Originally Posted by randhir View Post
    2. Can we announce same IPV4 block using seperate BGP session under two ASN simultaneously ?
    This is a bad idea, for multiple reasons. If a prefix within the block is not intended to be anycasted, the announcement originated by the ASN without connectivity to the prefix would effectively result in a blackhole. You'd also need to take care that you don't announce one prefix from one ASN that isn't part of a larger block originated by the other ASN. Keep in mind also that some networks filter prefixes even shorter than /24 due to limited router memory. Inconsistent origins can also result in the prefix being dampened.

    Is there any reason why you wouldn't just originate using the same ASN? Even if you're using a different ASN #2 at a different location, you could still originate from ASN #1 using ASN #2 as transit. Either that, or just setup 2nd BGP sessions to your transit providers at the other location to also use ASN #1.
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  3. #3
    I really don't see an issue with this as long as the traffic terminates in the ARIN region.
    Many ISP's etc use the same ASN globally. Some ILEC's like AT&T & Verizon don't, but thats usually an explicit choice to do regional ASN's rather than the norm.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon852 View Post
    I really don't see an issue with this as long as the traffic terminates in the ARIN region.
    Many ISP's etc use the same ASN globally. Some ILEC's like AT&T & Verizon don't, but thats usually an explicit choice to do regional ASN's rather than the norm.
    They may use multiple ASNs, but they originate different prefixes with each of them. They don't originate the same prefixes with multiple ASNs.
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by hhw View Post
    They may use multiple ASNs, but they originate different prefixes with each of them. They don't originate the same prefixes with multiple ASNs.
    Comcast does this with their regional and ibone ASN's - as long as your IGP in the backend can support it, I don't see the issue with that either.

    Just because at the edge you announce it under different ASN's doesn't mean it isn't one network on the backend.

    But, I was commenting on announcing ARIN space under the APNIC ASN, I would not think that would be an issue as long as the ARIN space you are announcing is really for servers in the ARIN region. If the only path you announce for this is via APNIC region, that would be frowned upon, regardless of using an APNIC or ARIN ASN.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon852 View Post
    Comcast does this with their regional and ibone ASN's - as long as your IGP in the backend can support it, I don't see the issue with that either.
    They really announce the same prefixes with multiple origin AS? Can you provide a prefix that's an example of this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon852 View Post
    Just because at the edge you announce it under different ASN's doesn't mean it isn't one network on the backend.
    We're not talking about the same cases here. Originating prefixes from multiple ASN's, and peering using multiple ASN's are very different things. The op's 2nd question was specifically the former case.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by hhw View Post
    They really announce the same prefixes with multiple origin AS? Can you provide a prefix that's an example of this?


    We're not talking about the same cases here. Originating prefixes from multiple ASN's, and peering using multiple ASN's are very different things. The op's 2nd question was specifically the former case.
    Here's an example from WOW: 64.233.205.0/24 - origin'd by both AS29859 and AS29895.

    I'm not saying I would bother, and it causes confusion, but I don't see why it is an issue if the backend network can route it to the right place?

    Comcast you won't see on the global table as you will see most paths through AS7922, you would only see it if you could see into the CRAN's which most people can't.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon852 View Post
    Here's an example from WOW: 64.233.205.0/24 - origin'd by both AS29859 and AS29895.
    That's quite interesting, good to know. Not sure if Comcast is exactly a shining example of best practice though, given their backbone performance isn't exactly the best.

    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon852 View Post
    I'm not saying I would bother, and it causes confusion, but I don't see why it is an issue if the backend network can route it to the right place?
    There's some potential for dampening caused by another network flipping back and forth between the two different origin ASN's, but probably not a huge concern.

    The op probably does not have a back-end network between the two locations though.
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  9. #9
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    *

    Quote Originally Posted by randhir View Post
    Kindly clarify two things as follows:
    1. can we announce IPv4 allocated by ARIN under ASN provided by APNIC ? If yes then any other configuration is required ?
    The relationships between IPs (inet-num) and ASNs (aut-num) are stored in public Internet Routing Registries (IRR) using Routing Policy Specification Language (RPSL). We have to create route object in APNIC and I think this is the only glue between IP(inet-num) and its ASN (aut-num). These information is maintained in the IRR database (RIRs such as RIPE, ARIN, etc) as well as some other parties such as RADB.

    While creating the route object, inet-num(ip) and aut-num(ASN) is validated that whether both belongs to same registry or not.

    1. Practically does any BGP router on internet take the reference from these RIR for routing validation and filtering ?
    If no, then why it is needed to create the route object in RIR?

    2. If bgp speaker on internet does not validate/refer IRR then what is the importance of this RIR in realtime bgp routing ? *

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by randhir View Post
    1. Practically does any BGP router on internet take the reference from these RIR for routing validation and filtering ?
    If no, then why it is needed to create the route object in RIR?
    Yes, many networks automatically generate their prefix lists using IRR's. You would need the route objects for any of your direct transit providers, and their direct peers that do this.

    Quote Originally Posted by randhir View Post
    2. If bgp speaker on internet does not validate/refer IRR then what is the importance of this RIR in realtime bgp routing ? *
    Networks who don't use IRR's are generally manually configuring their prefix lists on downstream customers, and depending on max prefixes on their peers to prevent route leaking. The IRR entries aren't needed in their case, but you still want them in place due to the networks who do use IRR's.
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