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Thread: Raspberry PI

  1. #1
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    Raspberry PI

    Christmas is approaching fast and on my wishlist was the RPI Model B with a decent SD card. So I happen to wonder who else has got these on this board and what do they use them for personally this will be for running my home media system which will be based off XBMC.

    Happy Approaching Holidays

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    Quote Originally Posted by cd/home View Post
    Christmas is approaching fast and on my wishlist was the RPI Model B with a decent SD card. So I happen to wonder who else has got these on this board and what do they use them for personally this will be for running my home media system which will be based off XBMC.

    Happy Approaching Holidays
    I am currently using mine as a SSH Gateway into my house. Seems a bit better then running a VPN. The setup is minimal and works well (Debian with a reverse SSH tunnel to a VM on a personal server)
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    I use mines to run pbxinaflash. Runs great without any problems. Would like to get me another one for other kool projects.

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    I use one as a backup server running rsnapshot (dumps data to a NAS).
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickey318 View Post
    I use mines to run pbxinaflash. Runs great without any problems. Would like to get me another one for other kool projects.
    There so cheap and decent I can see myself having a handful for various tasks

    Quote Originally Posted by ndelaespada View Post
    I use one as a backup server running rsnapshot (dumps data to a NAS).
    Had any problems with it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cd/home View Post
    There so cheap and decent I can see myself having a handful for various tasks



    Had any problems with it?

    Nope, I have it to set run hourly, daily, weekly and monthly.
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  7. #7
    I'm using my raspberry PI right now as a DNS server, I saw some guy make a spider out of his though and that looked pretty awesome

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    After waiting 3 months and I got one last year, but finally I sold it listing by local advertisement site. I had no time to make experiments with it
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    Heh.. i have half a dozen of these things still in box :-|
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    Mine logs my IRC channels, hosts a few small projects and I also compile my C assignments on it. That's about all it can do without lagging like hell.

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    Mine's been seriously speeding up my internet connection at home for good few months now, I installed Squid Proxy on it to achieve this.

    I also use it as an SSH connection to my house, and it updates the DynDNS hostname with the dynamic IP address whenever it changes.

    I also have another one which acts as a media server, though it's on the fringes of being just fast enough to live with for me to be honest. I can see myself heading back to just using my PS3 for that at the moment.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl_CLOOK View Post
    I also have another one which acts as a media server, though it's on the fringes of being just fast enough to live with for me to be honest. I can see myself heading back to just using my PS3 for that at the moment.
    Whats wrong with it?

    I got mine the other day as a surprise Christmas gift and now it's running RaspBMC without any problem. However I did notice the GPU temp was pretty high when not using video playback but I fixed by changing the vertical blank sync setting

  13. #13
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    It's a revision 1, 256MB version so that could have something to do with it.

    Though, as someone used to running XBMC on a "proper" machine, I find it annoying slow when trying to do anything that involves streaming/internet media.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cd/home View Post
    There so cheap
    One thing that Raspberry PI computers are not is cheap.

    For the same price you can buy a 1-3 year old Intel Atom system or an AMD Fusion APU system or something with a VIA CPU on it. And those are all real x86 systems just like most computers are and many times more powerful.

    The only advantage of something like a Raspberry PI is power consumption and size. If you are buying these because they are cheap you are doing it wrong.

    And I would also add, anyone buying several of these is also wasting their money. The power usage and size of around 5 or 6 of the Raspberry PI's is the same as any of the x86 embedded mini-ITX systems I mentioned, so you may as well just get one of those and virtualize it instead since your running costs will be the same and the build cost will be far lower.
    Last edited by ramnet; 12-02-2013 at 11:15 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl_CLOOK View Post
    It's a revision 1, 256MB version so that could have something to do with it.

    Though, as someone used to running XBMC on a "proper" machine, I find it annoying slow when trying to do anything that involves streaming/internet media.
    I use to run XBMC from an old laptop but it was unsightly having it all plugged so the RPI is a step in the right direction and it's cheaper to run so far I haven't noticed any issues with it running XBMC but mine is a different version so that could come into play with it too. Are you running yours wired or wireless?

    Quote Originally Posted by ramnet View Post
    One thing that Raspberry PI computers are not is cheap.

    For the same price you can buy a 1-3 year old Intel Atom system or an AMD Fusion APU system or something with a VIA CPU on it. And those are all real x86 systems just like most computers are and many times more powerful.

    The only advantage of something like a Raspberry PI is power consumption and size. If you are buying these because they are cheap you are doing it wrong.

    And I would also add, anyone buying several of these is also wasting their money. The power usage and size of around 5 or 6 of the Raspberry PI's is the same as any of the x86 embedded mini-ITX systems I mentioned, so you may as well just get one of those and virtualize it instead since your running costs will be the same and the build cost will be far lower.
    Build cost isn't an issue power consumption and size with the maximum computing power does matter that's why to me there cheap but whats cheap to me isn't always cheap to everyone else. The RPI's use around 3.5w @ 5.0v so you could likely run more than 6 with the power consumption of some mini-ITX systems.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cd/home View Post
    The RPI's use around 3.5w @ 5.0v so you could likely run more than 6 with the power consumption of some mini-ITX systems.
    The mini-ITX systems I referenced use around 20 to 30 watts all in (I measured an Atom 330 with 1 7.2k rpm hdd and 4gb of ddr2-800 that had a cheap oversized psu with a kill-a-watt at ~32 watts consumption many years ago and the newer ones are even better, particularly when coupled with an 80 plus gold psu that is properly sized for that kind of small load).

    3.5 watts times 6 is 21 watts. About the same as a much more powerful mini-ITX system.

    I would also add that many lower end laptops have very low power consumption at around 20 to 30 watts (this of course is harder to measure but the specs indicate as much)

    And this is notwithstanding that I expect many people will be using power bricks to power their PI's which are generally much less efficient than conventional computer power supplies.
    Last edited by ramnet; 12-02-2013 at 01:45 PM.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramnet View Post
    3.5 watts times 6 is 21 watts. About the same as a much more powerful mini-ITX system.
    Both systems run on completely different voltage with RPI's I don't need all the power of the earth so the power size and cost of the RPI's are cheap for me and better quality than some of the VPSes you see being flogged around here. It's a winner for me

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    Quote Originally Posted by cd/home View Post
    Both systems run on completely different voltage
    That simply does not matter.

    5 watts of usage is still 5 watts of usage, regardless if the delivery is at 5 volts or 200 volts.

    Watts are a measure of work (newton meters), and volts (along with amps) are not a measure of work. This is why your power company bills you in watts consumed.

    The Rasberry PI foundation recommends a 5 watt power supply that can deliver 1 amp at 5 volts. 5 watts at 5 volts to get 1 amp is the same as 5 watts at 120 volts 0.042 amps, assuming you found a power supply that was 100% efficient at converting it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramnet View Post
    That simply does not matter.

    5 watts of usage is still 5 watts of usage, regardless if the delivery is at 5 volts or 200 volts.

    Watts are a measure of work (newton meters), and volts (along with amps) are not a measure of work. This is why your power company bills you in watts consumed.

    The Rasberry PI foundation recommends a 5 watt power supply that can deliver 1 amp at 5 volts. 5 watts at 5 volts to get 1 amp is the same as 5 watts at 120 volts 0.042 amps, assuming you found a power supply that was 100% efficient at converting it.
    The lower voltage makes it easier for me to run them off solar power not mains. Am slowly converting over to solar rather than being ripped off by the electrical companies who offer nothing more than you can do your self. For me the RPI's are great because I don't need massive amounts of computing power and the DDR3 ram is quite nice too. Also with them being 5v I can run multiple RPI's if I needed too which I don't from a single powered USB hub.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cd/home View Post
    The lower voltage makes it easier for me to run them off solar power not mains. Am slowly converting over to solar rather than being ripped off by the electrical companies who offer nothing more than you can do your self.
    Good to hear, renewable energy is a great thing to have if you do it yourself at home.

    You might want to consider running a normal PC or laptop off your solar directly as well. One of those mini-ITX systems I mentioned would run off a 40 watt solar panel in full sun quite nicely with a few watts to spare for a Rasberry PI or two.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramnet View Post
    Good to hear, renewable energy is a great thing to have if you do it yourself at home.

    You might want to consider running a normal PC or laptop off your solar directly as well. One of those mini-ITX systems I mentioned would run off a 40 watt solar panel in full sun quite nicely with a few watts to spare for a Rasberry PI or two.
    It'll all come in handy for a rather big future project we've got on the cards

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