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Thread: Define "1 Amp"?

  1. #1
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    Define "1 Amp"?

    Most colo offers Iíve seen stipulate 1A power is included. Does this mean up to one amp or does this mean anything below 2 amps?

    I have a Phenom II X4 940 I would like to colo with six drives. A review I read showed power consumption at the PSU to be around 90w idle and up to 190w under full load. The drives will be 5400RPM and I expect ~4w idle and ~7w under load.

    If I add a power loss conversion of 25% to the drives I can see 30w idle and 53w load as reasonable.
    So, roughly:

    Idle: 90w + 30w = 120w or 1 AMP
    Load: 190w + 53w = 243w or 2.02 AMP


    Assuming I have an efficient PSU and donít add on other components, I suspect Iíll be under 2A 99% of the time and if I go over it will be very minimal. How do DCís handle this? Iím sure everyone DC is a bit different but I would like to know what I can expect.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Step 1:, don't assume go to your local hardware store and pickup a Watt-Amp or a Kill-A-Watt cost about <=$20 determine your actual usage profile

    Step 2: Ask the DC where you are planning to co-locate their policy on the issue if necessary.
    Lee Evans, Owner/Operator
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  3. #3
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    Amps = Watts/Volts

    So if your total wattage is figured at 243 watts / 110vac = 2.209 Amps.

    Now the kicker. The formula above does not take in to consideration the cost of converting the AC to DC. AKA.. The efficiency of the PSU.

    The 243 watts is DC load on the DC side of the PSU. Depending on how efficient your PSU is the realized load on the AC side will be higher.

    If it's one the of the 85%+ efficient PSU's then it will be close to that. If its not then it will be a little higher.

    Brandon

  4. #4
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    1A means 1A or under, not 1.xA
    If you need 1.xA - 2.00A, then you need 2A of power

    That CPU will use a lot of power, I would suggest buying something like the new i3-2100 series which is 65W TDP

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeware View Post
    Step 1:, don't assume go to your local hardware store and pickup a Watt-Amp or a Kill-A-Watt cost about <=$20 determine your actual usage profile

    Step 2: Ask the DC where you are planning to co-locate their policy on the issue if necessary.
    Yes, I plan on measuring the usage before I send it out. I probably shouldn't have spent so much time in the post speculating on the usage.

    My question really is- when you get "1 AMP", do you get 1.0 AMPS and not a bit more or do you generally get up to 1.99 AMPS?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGotzmann View Post
    1A means 1A or under, not 1.xA
    If you need 1.xA - 2.00A, then you need 2A of power

    That CPU will use a lot of power, I would suggest buying something like the new i3-2100 series which is 65W TDP
    Just what I needed to know, thanks!

  7. #7
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    Our colo provider rounds down, so if it's < 1.5 A then it is billed as 1 A.
    You should probably ask your provider how they define power usage.
    Preetam Jinka

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RelativeDesign-Jerret View Post
    My question really is- when you get "1 AMP", do you get 1.0 AMPS and not a bit more or do you generally get up to 1.99 AMPS?
    No more than 1.00000000000000000000A
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  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitcable View Post
    Our colo provider rounds down, so if it's < 1.5 A then it is billed as 1 A.
    You should probably ask your provider how they define power usage.
    Our tenant rounds up so you are right it would be best to confirm with your actual provider. As CGotzmann mentioned 1AMP means 1AMP and not more. If you require more than one AMP most tenants will charge you an additional amp for anything over the 1AMP. I am surprised that your provider rounds down .

    Here at 151 Front Street West one main concern/issue for the entire building/facility 1)Space and 2)Power. The cost for hydro has increased and in our case, a few of our older machines are consuming 1.5amps so we are billed at 2amps for these servers.
    Last edited by LevelHosting Inc; 06-15-2011 at 12:50 AM.
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  11. #11
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    Cost for an amp?

    This whole thread made me curious as to how much one additional amp costs a DC. I have no way of knowing how much more goes into building out a DC to support higher utilization, including additional UPS capability, cooling costs, extra circuits and so on.

    What we can do is figure out a rough cost of what the utility company will charge the DC for that amp. I did a little digging and found a website that shows the AVERAGE cost per kWh (in cents) for every state. I plugged this data into a spreadsheet and came out with some interesting numbers.

    I checked a couple sites for popular providers and it *appears* that the additional fees hover around two times the base utility cost. If we factor in the additional cost for the build out, UPS load and cooling my guess is that most datacenters make a *little* money on the additional amp fees. By little I'm thinking five bucks a month.

    Here's my spreadsheet:

    https://spreadsheets.google.com/a/re...t=html&ndplr=1

    I've never tried publishing a spreadsheet in google apps before so let me know if it doesn't work.

    Best,
    Jerret

  12. #12
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    You are correct, there is very little to no margin in power... colo as a whole is usually a low margin game per square foot. There is more margin in using that same rackspace/power capacity for almost any other type of hosted service other than colo.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RelativeDesign-Jerret View Post
    This whole thread made me curious as to how much one additional amp costs a DC. I have no way of knowing how much more goes into building out a DC to support higher utilization, including additional UPS capability, cooling costs, extra circuits and so on.

    What we can do is figure out a rough cost of what the utility company will charge the DC for that amp. I did a little digging and found a website that shows the AVERAGE cost per kWh (in cents) for every state. I plugged this data into a spreadsheet and came out with some interesting numbers.

    I checked a couple sites for popular providers and it *appears* that the additional fees hover around two times the base utility cost. If we factor in the additional cost for the build out, UPS load and cooling my guess is that most datacenters make a *little* money on the additional amp fees. By little I'm thinking five bucks a month.

    Here's my spreadsheet:

    https://spreadsheets.google.com/a/re...t=html&ndplr=1

    I've never tried publishing a spreadsheet in google apps before so let me know if it doesn't work.

    Best,
    Jerret
    Thanks very much for putting this out here Jerret,
    This is a very helpful chart.

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