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  1. #1
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    Is your colo IPV6 ready?

    One of ours is, one isn't. I'm thinking the one that isn't may be dragging their feet. How many of you are able to purchase IPV6 blocks and use them from your colo providers currently?

    (I appreciate that not all end users can access IPV6 networks at this time, but it would be a good additional selling point.)
    Last edited by ServiceProvider; 06-11-2011 at 03:20 PM.

  2. #2
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    I know that my comments will not answer your question however, I would like to make some general comments as to why there is some "foot dragging" for IPV6 deployments.

    1. The sky has been falling on IPv4 availability for about 15 years now. Just think about that for a minute.

    2. In spite of all of the media hype, just because all of the IPv4 space is assigned (mainly to carriers) doesn't mean that it is all used. In fact, I am pretty sure that if you buy connectivity from any name-brand carrier you will be able to get IPv4 with proper justification for years to come.

    3. The only people that *need* IPv6 today are Asian-based mobile phone carriers and ISPs. Other users would include Governmental Organizations that have technology mandates and finally, early adopters (techie-types) and people aiming for some kind of marketing edge. And the big rush among the last group will be just so that they can tunnel back to IPv4 where 98% of the Internet lives. This will remain the case for many years to come.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeware View Post
    I know that my comments will not answer your question however, I would like to make some general comments as to why there is some "foot dragging" for IPV6 deployments.

    1. The sky has been falling on IPv4 availability for about 15 years now. Just think about that for a minute.

    2. In spite of all of the media hype, just because all of the IPv4 space is assigned (mainly to carriers) doesn't mean that it is all used. In fact, I am pretty sure that if you buy connectivity from any name-brand carrier you will be able to get IPv4 with proper justification for years to come.

    3. The only people that *need* IPv6 today are Asian-based mobile phone carriers and ISPs. Other users would include Governmental Organizations that have technology mandates and finally, early adopters (techie-types) and people aiming for some kind of marketing edge. And the big rush among the last group will be just so that they can tunnel back to IPv4 where 98% of the Internet lives. This will remain the case for many years to come.
    Very well said. I wish our providers were v6 ready - one states they are ready on the network end, just ubersmith is not..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougy View Post
    Very well said. I wish our providers were v6 ready - one states they are ready on the network end, just ubersmith is not..
    Ubersmith has fully supported IPv6 for years.

  5. #5
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    As much as I love my current provider based on uptime and pricing, they've been "working hard" to adopt IPv6 for the last 14 months. I'm not sure where the hold-up is, they've had Hurricane Electric in their mix for about a year and their infrastructure isn't old enough to be a problem. I guess the devil's in the details, specifically allocation policies and designing the roll-out process.

    Bleh. Well, at least with their HE transit lit I get lower hop counts to the nearest Tunnelbroker POP!
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  6. #6
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    Our service provider has assigned us IPv6 space, with the caveat that IPv6 traffic is not covered under the SLA.

  7. #7
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    We're still waiting for Savvis to be IPv6 ready.... they are aiming for *2012*! We've made other arrangements in the mean time but it's pretty disappointing.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compari...nsit_providers - look at the Chart on the bottom of that page - very disappointing Savvis!

    *edit*: I just called the Savvis support desk and asked of there was any update as to the availability of IP6 and the guy on the phone asked 'is that a patch or...?'. sigh.
    Last edited by MaB; 06-13-2011 at 08:50 PM.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeware View Post
    1. The sky has been falling on IPv4 availability for about 15 years now. Just think about that for a minute.
    There is talks on nanog, go search for it for a final cut over date for IPv4 -> IPv6 which was slated and agreed to happen on 12/31/2019. The only thing holding back IPv6 is the end user networks which are starting to adapt quickly.

    The majority of firewall companies are being forced into IPv6 as well, this is probably the other limiting factor of ipv6 on wide scale. For whatever reason ipv6 is slow on the firewall side of the networking world.

  9. #9
    I was given a /64 from my provider (E-Solutions in Tampa) for no charge, and haven't experienced any issues at all.

  10. #10
    IPv6 is the way to go, and quite honestly any colocation or dedicated server provider not offering ipv6 adresses is kind of bad.

    Most (tier) providers nowadays support ipv6, and are able to give you it as dual stack so you don't have to worry too much either.

    We have been serving out ipv6 addresses to our clients for well over 5 years now, and with much success at that. About 60% of all our traffic is IPv6 nowadays. (at a 80%datacenter to 20%home usage)
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  11. #11
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    I am also somewhat disappointed that my colo, GoRACK, doesn't have IPv6 yet, but I keep nudging them and suspect it won't be too much longer. Not sure of the specifics of the hold-up, but I do know it's all new to a lot of people. Even whenever they're ready for me - I'll be going through the phase of learning how to get v6 stacks installed on my various virtual servers and getting those DNS records published and see how it works.

    I can understand not getting IPv6 covered under SLA for the time being as well since there's probably quite a few IPv6 networks out there that may not be set up correctly all the same.

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  12. #12
    Actually, if you want to have ipv6 on your servers already, you might want to look at tunnelbrokers like hurricane or sixxs in combination with aiccu(or move to a ipv6 enabled provider). The downtime is extremely limited and is very usable for webhosting and such. I wouldn't advice putting crucials on it, but it definitely works ace!.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiLightINC View Post
    quite honestly any colocation or dedicated server provider not offering ipv6 adresses is kind of bad.
    I don't think I'd go quite that far. IPv6 support is also dependent on upstream readiness -- and let's face it, there isn't much widespread use of IPv6 yet. You may be using it, but generally speaking, it has little use to the masses . . . yet.

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    ...And the catch-22 keeps on rolling.

    You can't justify not having IPv6 by saying there's not enough of a business case for it yet, or that there aren't enough v6 eyeballs out there to make it worth your while. IPv4 will deplete, IPv6 will replace it. There's no "if" scenario here.

    Telecoms and content providers are at an impasse when it comes to v6. One doesn't want to invest the capital because the other doesn't have it all set up on their end. The roles get reversed in this situation every 5 minutes because that italicized phrase is the argument that's being used on both sides of the table. Nobody's going to get anywhere with that kind of thinking.

    The problem with this industry is that there are too many followers. Hardly anybody's creative anymore. You can't rent a server, install a CP, set a pricing structure and be set for life. Innovate! Improve your services. Add features, even if nobody's going to be using them right away. Proactivity is more appealing to customers than reactivity. Be proactive and take steps to put yourself ahead of the curve. You can kick back and relax while everyone else struggles with it at the last minute.
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    You missed my point. Obviously IPv6 is not an "if" scenario. As a telco engineer I have a vested interest in deploying IPv6, thank you very much.

    From a consumer standpoint, would I call a colo or provider "bad" because they don't support IPv6 today, no. As a consumer, I care about features I need.
    Last edited by Microlinux; 06-14-2011 at 04:23 PM.

  16. #16
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    My comments weren't directed at you, Todd. I'm just frustrated with the "No, you go first!" mentality that the telcos and content providers have been throwing around this whole time.
    Quote Originally Posted by [CTI] Todd View Post
    From a consumer standpoint, would I call a colo or provider "bad" because they don't support IPv6 today, no.
    Nor would I, but I would call a provider "bad" if they didn't think ahead, and were just ignoring the purple elephant in the living room.
    Quote Originally Posted by [CTI] Todd View Post
    As a consumer, I care about features I need.
    As do I, but there's got to be a certain amount of foresight in your planning procedures. If I were to search for a new provider right now, any company that isn't already planning their migration to IPv6 would be stricken from my list.

    Now, that's not to say that they'd have to have IPv6 completely and totally operational, but I'd at least like to see them planning their network and systems around the v6 changeover. I chose my current provider over a year ago because I knew they had IPv6 in mind and were actively working to implement it (i.e., bringing in HE.net transit). Even though a year has gone by and I haven't gotten an allocation yet, it's comforting to know that they're not just sweeping it under the rug with no intent to do it until it's absolutely necessary.
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    Agreed on all points Dan!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by danclough View Post
    ...And the catch-22 keeps on rolling.

    You can't justify not having IPv6 by saying there's not enough of a business case for it yet, or that there aren't enough v6 eyeballs out there to make it worth your while.
    While I understand and appreciate your passion regarding the issue. I disagree. I think that people can justify and will not move forward to embrace a technology until it makes economic sense or is a absolute necessity. Most of the people I know are in business to make money. Therefore, they are not in a hurry to spend money irresponsibly on something that might not matter much in the short-term i.e. the next 5-7 years. I mean what economic benefit is there for everyone to jump to IPv6 right now? Not much when 99.9% of the Internet as it exists today is IPv4. Is it necessary for some? Absolutely! But what about everyone else? Not really. Therefore, the reality is that while there are going to be a growing chorus of early adopters that want it now. It is frankly not enough demand or necessity for the people who have to facilitate this to invest heavily in something that does not offer a return. Therefore, I don't think that this has as much to do with technology as people might imagine. Another thing that keeps getting overlooked in these discussions as well as the the ones on Nanog. Is that the network carriers are sitting on millions of IP addresses that are allocated but are unused. Therefore, they have enough IP space to service their business needs for years into the future.


    Quote Originally Posted by danclough View Post
    The problem with this industry is that there are too many followers. Hardly anybody's creative anymore. You can't rent a server, install a CP, set a pricing structure and be set for life. Innovate! Improve your services. Add features, even if nobody's going to be using them right away. Proactivity is more appealing to customers than reactivity. Be proactive and take steps to put yourself ahead of the curve. You can kick back and relax while everyone else struggles with it at the last minute.

    Let's not kid ourselves the entire hosting market is a commodity. Furthermore, It is easy to talk about how people should innovate when we aren't the ones writing the checks for said innovation. Finally, I would imagine there are a lot of folks looking to cash in on the big IPV6 revolution by positioning themselves to provide some kind of professional services and for those people the change can't happen fast enough. But we've all seen this movie before and we know how it ends.
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  19. #19
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    The fact that web hosting is a commoditized service doesn't mean that it shouldn't be regularly updated and improved. Most web hosts will fight to the penny on pricing, while they leave new features in the dust. That's not how a responsible business should operate, regardless of how price-competitive the market may be.

    The major ISPs may be sitting on millions of currently-unused IPv4 addresses, but how fast are they being handed out with the massive increase in smartphones and tablets? It's faster than you think. I know you know that everything that can access the internet NEEDS an IP address. And despite what some telco execs may think (I say "execs" because the technical people know better ), mass-NATing their customers won't fix anything. It causes more problems than it appears to solve.

    Depletion is coming. It may not happen right now, or even six months from now, but why do we have to wait until the system's broken to fix it? We've identified the problem, we've identified the solution, and it's time to implement it to avoid that typical "sky-is-falling" crisis from actually happening.

    I may not run a datacenter or an ISP, but despite not writing any checks, I can tell you that most (if not all) enterprise networking devices manufactured in the last 10 years support IPv6. The only real determinable costs associated with the switchover is replacing outdated hardware/software (which I hope would happen anyway!), buying allocations from your RIR (they'll practically throw them at you if you have a v4 handout) and maybe bringing an IPv6-capable transit provider into your mix if you don't already have one.

    Before anyone argues how infeasible it may be for small hosts... yes, I understand. They very largely depend on their provider for infrastructure. It's understandable that they lag behind the bigger names. But for the large operations that have considerable say over their transit providers and infrastructure... there's no sound reason to ignore IPv6!
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    I only wish it were as simple as you present it. Unfortunately, that's generally not the case.

  21. #21
    IPv6 from a "network" perspective is easy - anyone not ready for IPv6 yet at a network level has some serious legacy stuff going on. The issue for our industry with respect to IPv6 is in the software. I dont know if any commercially available or homegrown control panels are actually production ready with respect to IPv6 compatability - and of course in this industry, a larger number of users are utilizing control panels.

    Although IPv4 depletion will not become a real crisis for quite some time (as someone previously mentioned) - we are in a rush to get off of the IPv4 platform. At the very least we want to run legacy IPv4 and IPv6 in parallel for the next several years - and that isnt an easy process - especially when you consider how many end users are using control panels that do not support the newer protocol yet...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by [CTI] Todd View Post
    I only wish it were as simple as you present it. Unfortunately, that's generally not the case.
    On the ISP end, when dealing with residential/business customers and very specialized equipment (CMTS, DSLAM et al), it is indeed a lot more complex than I make it sound. At that point you're tangling with multiple vendors on top of the RIR and your peering points. I agree fully that it must be a world of hurt, trying to get complex technologies to play nice with each other in that regard.

    But on the datacenter end, for a colo provider, it really isn't that much of a struggle once you cut through the bureaucracy and get down to the technical details. There's no specialized technology in a datacenter, it's all Ethernet from the core down to the access layer and straight into the devices. If you're a Cisco shop and your routers run anything above 12.1 (I'd be worried if they didn't), it's nothing too daunting. Ubersmith supports IPv6, switches are oblivious to IP except for management purposes, and so on. Once you're able to secure v6-capable transit and an allocation, what's to stop you from testing it and getting the ball rolling?

    Of course, the power of bureaucracy is nothing to discount. I have a feeling that that's where many large organizations trip up in trying to implement new things.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by danclough View Post
    The fact that web hosting is a commoditized service doesn't mean that it shouldn't be regularly updated and improved. Most web hosts will fight to the penny on pricing, while they leave new features in the dust. That's not how a responsible business should operate, regardless of how price-competitive the market may be.
    I think that we are talking about two things now because IPV6 isn't a "new feature" it is a communications protocol that is incompatible with IPv4 therefore, it was created as a way forward to address the addressing limitations of IPv4. Nothing more and nothing less.


    Quote Originally Posted by danclough View Post
    The major ISPs may be sitting on millions of currently-unused IPv4 addresses, but how fast are they being handed out with the massive increase in smartphones and tablets? It's faster than you think. I know you know that everything that can access the internet NEEDS an IP address. And despite what some telco execs may think (I say "execs" because the technical people know better ), mass-NATing their customers won't fix anything. It causes more problems than it appears to solve.
    They are not running out as fast as the media would suggest and obviously you believe. This is because people keep confusing that just because the RIR are low on blocks doesn't mean the ISPs are running out of IP space. Like I said before they are sitting on enough space to last them for years into the future. Furthermore, keep in mind that a lot of people are using PA space therefore, when they terminate their services which happens everyday those allocations go back into the providers free / available pools. Therefore, I think that you are making a lot of gross assumptions about how all of this works or your understanding of the issue is at best myopic.


    Quote Originally Posted by danclough View Post
    Depletion is coming. It may not happen right now, or even six months from now, but why do we have to wait until the system's broken to fix it? We've identified the problem, we've identified the solution, and it's time to implement it to avoid that typical "sky-is-falling" crisis from actually happening.
    I think that no matter how much *you* personally want IPv6 the reality is that business dictates technology and not the other way around. 15 years ago people were singing the same song and dancing the same dance just as passionately as you are today. Think about that for a moment and then think about how far off into the future the pending doom you imagine that is right around the corner is. The bottom line if you are mobile carrier or other device manufacture and you need 20-30 million IP addresses you can use IPv6 today to tunnel those devices back to the IPv4 Internet where just about everything else is operating today and will do so for several years into the future. While you don't have to take my word for it. It is not unreasonable assertion to say that there will be no large-scale big switch to IPv6 anytime soon but more of a multi-decade transition from IPv4 to IPv6. And, it won't be until we reach the other side of that bell-curve that the situation you *think* exists today will actually be true. We've seen this movie before and we know how it ends.

    Quote Originally Posted by danclough View Post
    I may not run a datacenter or an ISP, but despite not writing any checks, I can tell you that most (if not all) enterprise networking devices manufactured in the last 10 years support IPv6. The only real determinable costs associated with the switchover is replacing outdated hardware/software (which I hope would happen anyway!), buying allocations from your RIR (they'll practically throw them at you if you have a v4 handout) and maybe bringing an IPv6-capable transit provider into your mix if you don't already have one.

    Before anyone argues how infeasible it may be for small hosts... yes, I understand. They very largely depend on their provider for infrastructure. It's understandable that they lag behind the bigger names. But for the large operations that have considerable say over their transit providers and infrastructure... there's no sound reason to ignore IPv6!
    You are taking a very tech-centric view of an issue that doesn't have a lot to do with technology but business. If we try the following thought experiment. Imagine IPs as phone numbers. Imagine that under IPv4 you have simple 10-digit phone numbers. There is a world of infrastructure build around the existing numbering system. But after many years of tricks and games to extend this system you reach an end and now you create a new incompatible phone system. It makes more sense to simply but the new people on the new phone system and create a bridge for them back to the old phone system until you reach a point where the new phone system is bigger than the old one. It is impractical and cost prohibitive to completely scrape the old phone system and replace it with a new one. On individual systems perhaps but on a wholesale global inter-connected system no way and no how. Remember I said it here first years!
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiLightINC View Post
    Actually, if you want to have ipv6 on your servers already, you might want to look at tunnelbrokers like hurricane or sixxs in combination with aiccu(or move to a ipv6 enabled provider). The downtime is extremely limited and is very usable for webhosting and such. I wouldn't advice putting crucials on it, but it definitely works ace!.
    Yeah, I'm aware of tunneling type services, but I'm not interested in it that badly. IPv6 should be available directly at my interface via the switched Ethernet provided so I don't have to deal with any obfuscation or otherwise weirdness I would need to deal with at my firewalls/routers, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leeware View Post
    <snip>
    Your phone system analogy is a good start but your basis for bringing it up is flawed. Technically, it's a sound example, and it's exactly how it should work. But what's all this talk of scrapping one system completely and immediately in favor of another? Show me where I ever suggested that. IPv4 and v6 are definitely incompatible to every reasonable extent (barring tunneling and v4-mapped v6 addresses) but that doesn't mean they can't coexist. I know how all this works, you're just misreading the entire point I'm trying to make - providers need to focus on implementing IPv6 alongside their existing v4 network. That's what almost everybody is talking about when they discuss IPv6 adoption.

    When I refer to IPv6 being a "feature" of hosting, it's the nature of their network being dual-stack that's the real feature. And in terms of being "new", the implementation is new. Sure, the specs may have been around for over 15 years and it may have been supported for about the last decade, but it's new in most people's minds because over the last few years more people have begun to give a damn.

    Also, I'm not debating how soon it'll happen, I'm just establishing that we know it will happen, and we have a solution in place that can coexist with the current IP for the time being.

    I'm not going to lie and say I'm not very enthusiastic about v6 adoption - I think everybody here gets that given my borderline-lunatic rambling. As you probably guessed, I tend to be very spirited and motivated when it comes to implementing solutions to problems... so I carry it over into everything I do.
    Last edited by danclough; 06-15-2011 at 01:19 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SC-Daniel View Post
    Ubersmith has fully supported IPv6 for years.
    Indeed, we're using our IPv6 in Ubersmith.

    On the other hand, not even cPanel supports IPv6. We're having to do 6to4 proxies inside our network for customers who want to use IPv6 with cPanel.

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    I dont know if any commercially available or homegrown control panels are actually production ready with respect to IPv6 compatability
    Webmin, Kloxo, liveconfig, Directadmin, NginxCP, OVZ-Webpanel.... all fully IPv6 ready.
    Only "big" panels missing are Cpanel and Solusvm, even Plesk supports IPv6 now since a longer time.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by danclough View Post
    I'm not going to lie and say I'm not very enthusiastic about v6 adoption - I think everybody here gets that given my borderline-lunatic rambling. As you probably guessed, I tend to be very spirited and motivated when it comes to implementing solutions to problems... so I carry it over into everything I do.
    To clarify my position

    My only intent was to communicate kindly some of the real reasons that businesses i.e. carriers might not share your enthusiasm for making IPv6 available to people who basically don't need it anytime soon. Which is not the same as they don't know how to do it or that the technology is not there to make it happen. As indicated in this discussion Hurricane Electric has been out in front on this issue for years.

    If you are a large destination site then I can see the point in dual stacking because over the coming years there will be an increasing number of ipv6 enabled devices coming online. However, in cases where many of those devices need to reach the regular Internet they will use gateways to do so and the reverse is also true. Therefore, dual-stacking for the average Joe offers no real benefit.

    There is a difference in needing something and wanting something and far too many people have confused themselves that what they want is what they need.

    As a business analyst, I can tell you that I will on occasion see and IPv6 implementation proposal. Usually from the same folks that want to use/try/play with every new technology that comes around the corner regardless of its suitability for the line of business and I will send back a request basically asking them to make the specific case for why this particular line of business needs to engage in such an adventure. That's when the contortions start and the net result is the bulk of their advocacy is not relevant to objective reality.

    None of this means that I am against IPv6 in anyway. I think that it will be deployed when needed by the people who need it in circumstances where it is necessary. IPv6 is an evolutionary technology a type that will need to be implemented in the core and then moved out to the edges not the other way around to the great frustration of many individual early adopters it will be a while before you can call up your ISP and demand that they natively support IPv6 for you.

    The validity of what I am attempting to communicate to you is not contingent upon your acceptance of it.
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  29. #29
    OK - I know I said "I dont know of any" - and that was probably poorly worded

    Quote Originally Posted by EDIS View Post
    Webmin, Kloxo, liveconfig, Directadmin, NginxCP, OVZ-Webpanel.... all fully IPv6 ready.
    none of these are significant, to us anyway, except DirectAdmin and last time we checked with them (which was quite recently), IPv6 was in beta

    Only "big" panels missing are Cpanel and Solusvm, even Plesk supports IPv6 now since a longer time.
    I didnt know about Plesk - but, we would never use it...

    cPanel is a big one - and the other 2 (hsphere and websitepanel) we use are not v6 compatible - though, I should double check to see if WSP has added support recently.

    From our perspective, and I guess what I was getting at in the post,

    its hard to offer IPv6 as a hosting provider when so many control panels - or at least the ones we offer - do not support it. We deal with hsphere, cpanel, directadmin and websitepanel - and from that list, if you are accurate, then only directadmin supports it. In order to move to v6 - and even OFFER it as an option or even run it side by side with v4, we are waiting on software vendors to become compliant - heck, with hsphere, we are coding in v6 compatibility ourselves because I doubt Parallels will get to it in a reasonable timeframe.

    This is not an issue of "adding a feature" as one person mentioned. It is not even a matter of having the proper networking or infrastructure. We are sitting on a large v6 allocation from ARIN (they are literally giving them away right now) - our networks are ready and our upstreams are ready. There is a disconnect here and everyone is moving at a different pace and its going to be awhile before all providers make IPv6 ready in all of their offerings - and honestly, right now - it is a very niche market.

  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by leeware View Post
    They are not running out as fast as the media would suggest and obviously you believe. This is because people keep confusing that just because the RIR are low on blocks doesn't mean the ISPs are running out of IP space. Like I said before they are sitting on enough space to last them for years into the future. Furthermore, keep in mind that a lot of people are using PA space therefore, when they terminate their services which happens everyday those allocations go back into the providers free / available pools.
    you are of course correct and I agree with most of what you have said. We fully expect to be running IPv4 alongside IPv6 for AT LEAST a decade - maybe longer - simply no doubt about it. Absolutely I also agree that there is no doomsday looming here for the internet...

    Having said this, from a hosting providers perspective, I could care less how many IPv4 IPs ISPs are sitting on - they are useless to us. It is also WAY easier for them to use solely IPv6 and access both IPv4 and IPv6 services (as compared to hosting providers where it will be much more difficult to have IPv6 viewable to legacy IPv4 internet).

    I simply cannot tell you how much time, resources and money we have spent redoing our networks, getting off any legacy IP space we had from our upstream colo providers, customizing software to be IPv6 ready when vendors are not moving quickly enough, etc...

    For providers like us who get IP allocations from ARIN - this impending IPv4 "depletion" is much more critical then you are giving it credit for. It is hosting providers that are eating through IP addresses quickly as more and more sites, services, servers, VMs, clouds, etc are fired up each and every day. Providers who are not ready for this, will, in my opinion, get burned.

    The fact ISPs are sitting on massive allocations, or the fact that upstreams like level3, etc are sitting on massive blocks means nothing to me - except I know that they are going to rake providers over the coals for brokering out their IPs. I can even imagine a scenario where ISPs refuse to make the change to v6 (which would allow their users to view both v6 and v4 networks and services) just so they can broker out their massive influx of v4 addresses at loan shark rates.

    So, although I completely agree that there isnt a "doomsday" crisis out there - and although I completely agree that v4 is going to be around for 10,20 or maybe even 30 years.. the impending depletion of IPv4 IP blocks that ARIN can assign - is going to have a massive impact to hosting providers - I really dont think most are ready for this or even getting ready for it - should be interesting...

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    534
    Thank you, everyone, for the candid and civil debate over IPv6 implementation. A lot of really great information is being exchanged here and the more it's discussed, the more everyone can get a better feeling for how important (or not) that it is to get rolled out.

    --Chris
    The Object Zone - Your Windows Server Specialists for more than twelve years - http://www.object-zone.net/
    Services: Contract Server Management, Desktop Support Services, IT/VoIP Consulting, Cloud Migration, and Custom ASP.net and Mobile Application Development

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    46
    This was a great topic to bring up. I am happy to say we are currently offering IPv6. It has taken some time but it is a necessity to undertake as many have stated. I am actually surprised at how long so are waiting.

  33. #33
    Honestly I dont see how a lot of people can live without. We basically give each client a /64 and a /29 per server. Its exactly enough for each port the server has plus their kvm etc. as for.the large ipv6 block... Its easier that way. Sharing a smaller block is possible but due to more specifics and such and we do have a few reannounces its not worth the trouble and or hassle.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    32
    We are IPv6 ready next month. Why this timing? Completely customer driven.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
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    Meaning, supply should follow demand and we've been taken to that point. If our customers are representative of the broader market, I'd imagine other providers are working on or should be introducing soon.

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    5,512
    World IPv6 Day on June 8th was the capstone event that really propelled IPv6 traffic to the next level and showed mainstream support for adoption.

    NOW is the time to be IPv6 ready.

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Lisbon, Portugal
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    264
    Quote Originally Posted by IRCCo Jeff View Post
    NOW is the time to be IPv6 ready.
    Agree, but cPanel and other control panels not ready yet...

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by asturmas View Post
    Agree, but cPanel and other control panels not ready yet...
    Use haproxy to build a reverse proxy in front of cPanel to handle the IPv6 traffic.

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    463
    Quote Originally Posted by IRCCo Jeff View Post
    Use haproxy to build a reverse proxy in front of cPanel to handle the IPv6 traffic.
    Yea, but this makes the logs ugly.

    It's easier to just hack in the virtualhosts as you go, or modify the template file.
    Seattle, WA - Gigabit Carrier & Network Services Provider
    Uptime | Atlas Networks

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