Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1

    Arrow Power prices 220v vs 120

    Hi guys

    Can someone give me some guidance on power prices of 220v vs 120v?

    I was told I could lower my AMP consumption by switching from 120v (currently) to 220v per cabinet. Ideas?

    What is the pricing like? Does it only require the datacenter to switch the circuit breakers? Thanks
    ^_^

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    3,301
    Oi vey. If you use 10 amps at 120v (1.2kW), you will use 5.8 amps at 208v or 5.45 amps at 220v. Either way, you are using the same total power - 1.2kW. Your total power cost should be the same due to this.
    Jay Sudowski // Handy Networks LLC // Co-Founder & CTO
    AS30475 - Level(3), HE, Telia, XO and Cogent. Noction optimized network.
    Offering Dedicated Server and Colocation Hosting from our SSAE 16 SOC 2, Type 2 Certified Data Center.
    Current specials here. Check them out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    367

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    1,103
    overall your actual consumption will not change , 220v circuit will have basically double the cost of per amp or more based on location

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,735
    how can i calculate how much power certain hardware spec will use ? thanx

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    2,762
    Erm... not to sound rude or something but with your question, it really reminds me of my college days. Taking out a Multi-Meter and putting on the power to test the voltage, resistance and etc.

    Ps. Sorry for side tracking.

    Anyways, back to your question. How to calculate? Well... most hardware when purchased will actually tell you how much power is consumed and etc. You can calculate it from there.
    Aaron Ong
    Dedicated Servers - 100TB Servers - 100Mbps Unmetered Servers - Web Hosting - CDN Network
    Servers in Central, East/West Coast USA, EUROPE and ASIA
    Welltodo Century
    - www.welltodocentury.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    597
    In facebook's custom DC, everything runs at 220v which makes one think it is more efficient in some way, but perhaps not at the server level.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    6,456
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Suds View Post
    Oi vey. If you use 10 amps at 120v (1.2kW), you will use 5.8 amps at 208v or 5.45 amps at 220v. Either way, you are using the same total power - 1.2kW. Your total power cost should be the same due to this.
    You might get a *tiny bit* more efficiency using 208/220v then 120v, though. I remember reading that somewhere..
    simplywww: directadmin and cpanel hosting that will rock your socks
    Need some work done in a datacenter in the NYC area? NYC Remote Hands can do it.

    Follow my "deals" Twitter for hardware specials.. @dougysdeals

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    1,103
    obviously running at 220v saves quite some amount on power cabling, the same cable carries more KWH at higher voltages. basically the copper losses are dependent on amps at i square R, and not on voltage and all these cables are rated upto 1kv+ so it does not matter what we use that for say 110v or 220v, to run at 110v the same wire needs to be much more thick copper so higher costs than 220v infrastructure.
    a little extra efficiency can be seen at PSU level.

    should not compare general DC's to purpose built DC like facebook/google/microsoft, there is much more flexibility built around at all levels to get most out of it.
    Last edited by Krazy; 04-20-2011 at 07:58 AM. Reason: extra text

  10. #10
    Also worth keeping in mind that most PC power supplies are more efficient at the higher voltage level, so you might save a couple % off your power use by boosting the voltage. Overall, the cost will be nearly identical from most facilities.
    Phoenix Dedicated Servers -- IOFLOOD.com
    Email: sales [at] ioflood.com
    Skype: iofloodsales
    Backup Storage VPS -- 1TBVPS.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    307
    Quote Originally Posted by Krazy View Post
    obviously running at 220v saves quite some amount on power cabling, the same cable carries more KWH at higher voltages. basically the copper losses are dependent on amps at i square R, and not on voltage and all these cables are rated upto 1kv+ so it does not matter what we use that for say 110v or 220v, to run at 110v the same wire needs to be much more thick copper so higher costs than 220v infrastructure.
    a little extra efficiency can be seen at PSU level.

    should not compare general DC's to purpose built DC like facebook/google/microsoft, there is much more flexibility built around at all levels to get most out of it.
    This is incorrect. The wire size will depend on the amperage, not the voltage.
    You can sometimes even get away with smaller wire with higher voltages. This will depend on your local codes.

    To answer the OP's question:

    A 20A 208V/220V circuit will generally be double the price of a 20A 120V. The material cost for 220V is more so expect a higher setup fee (if applicable).

    208V power can be considered more "efficient" for the customer because you can draw more power with a single circuit. Some facilities will limit your power based on the number of circuits per cabinet.

    For example:

    2x [email protected] power circuits can use up to 32A which is ~3.5KW

    2x [email protected] power circuits can use up to 32A which is ~6.6KW
    Last edited by DPG; 04-20-2011 at 11:41 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    131
    Quote Originally Posted by topgun View Post
    In facebook's custom DC, everything runs at 220v which makes one think it is more efficient in some way, but perhaps not at the server level.
    Custom 277V AC with DC backup and 94.5% efficiency.

    http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/a...s-server-room/

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    1,103
    i was saying the same thing, to run a X equipment (servers in this case say 10kw rack) on 110v requires thicker cabling due to higher amps, to run same equipment on 220v ( assumed 110/220v psu) requires thinner cables due to less amps. So there is less cost in cabling, same applies for breakers too, (saves money there)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    L.A., CA
    Posts
    3,706
    I've found that 220v cables cost more and are less readily available than 120v cables though.

    C13 to C14 cables that I've seen always cost more

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    1,103
    This is because how 220v(208v) is achieved is different in US

    110V -us simple phase neutral earth
    220v -uk/asia simple phase neutral earth

    above both are usually available ready and cheap, phase and neutral are equal thick and earth wire is thinner

    110v 3ph or phase to phase is 208v
    220v uk/asia 3phase or phase to phase is 415v

    the above types are for higher load applications and usually expensive , they need more leads within the cable etc..
    3phase cable are higher in price.
    Last edited by Krazy; 04-21-2011 at 05:19 AM. Reason: spelling

  16. #16

    What should be the price for 220V?

    Thank you all for the great explanations. It helped me a lot.

    Would you talk about the actual pricing that hosting companies charge?

    My hosting company wants about 70% more just to change the circuit to 220V.

    Can you recommend a good hosting company with a fair price for 220V?

    Thanks!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    L.A., CA
    Posts
    3,706
    220v is double power, so 70% more is fair. in fact, more than fair, they should charge a higher %.

  18. #18
    They did not offer double the power, and power is not the only element you buy in collocation.

    If anyone has some recommendations I will be grateful.

    Thanks.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    L.A., CA
    Posts
    3,706
    you need to get a clue, me thinks
    re-read this thread to properly understand what it is you are asking for when you ask for your colo to switch your circuit to 220v

  20. #20
    Thank you, you are very kind.

    Sorry, my vendor do not price it as nice and simple as you guys do.

    I still maintain that power is not the only thing you buy in a collocation, even if you think differently.

    Again, if someone (a customer) has any recommendation for a company they use... Thanks.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    /dev/null
    Posts
    2,131
    how many amps they offered before and how many are they offering now?

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    /dev/null
    Posts
    2,131
    Quote Originally Posted by gulli1 View Post
    I still maintain that power is not the only thing you buy in a collocation, even if you think differently.
    Power is THE only thing you buy in a colocation. It is the only factor that defines how much minimum space you'll be forced to buy, and it is how much maximum you can grow. The rest is dependant on your power usage.

Similar Threads

  1. Good place to get C13 to C14 220V power cables?
    By ItsChrisG in forum Colocation and Data Centers
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-29-2010, 07:36 PM
  2. ~ 120 Domains for sale PRICES INCLUDED!
    By portal in forum Domain Name Offers
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-30-2004, 06:21 PM
  3. Dell Power.App 120. If you have a boot disk, please contact me! help
    By Cephren in forum Hosting Security and Technology
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-24-2003, 08:21 PM
  4. Get the power of a dedicated server at shared prices!
    By FindMyHost in forum Dedicated Hosting Offers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-06-2002, 12:25 PM
  5. Get the power of a dedicated server at shared prices!
    By FindMyHost in forum Shared Hosting Offers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-05-2002, 03:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •