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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    610

    Thumbs up UK dedicated server recommendation

    Looking for some recommendations for a UK dedicated server, our requirements are quite low in spec but we are look for a reliable company with telephone support (ideally 24 hours but 9-5 would be acceptable UK based).

    Server specs:

    CPU: dual core at least
    RAM: 4GB RAM
    Hard Drive: 80GB SSD (this is a requirement)
    Bandwidth: 500GB (100MB uplink preferred)
    OS: Linux - cPanel
    Backups: If backup space is included that would be great, if not then we can source that ourselves.

    If anyone has any suggestions based on those requirements that would be excellent! I have been an OVH customer before but they have no support and we are not looking to go back there.

  2. #2
    I'll just throw in that you don't just look at hardware specs and bandwidth allowance. You also need to make sure the host has good peering so that you actually *get* the speed you want to your worldwide users. For instance, let's use your prior host OVH as an example. For transmissions that go outside Europes, OVH has an absolutely terrible lack of good peering deals, meaning that traffic to the U.S, Middle East and Asia goes over slow, shared 10mbit transit lines (if I remember their speed correctly). This has been claimed as one of the reasons that OVH doesn't accept customers from outside a few select European countries.

    So apart from your hardware requirements above, look into a host that has peering deals with at least Level3 (cream of the crop and will get you very far worldwide, because they are the biggest provider tying Europe and America together) and preferrably other A-list networks like Telia, Global Crossing, etc. You can see a list of Tier 1 networks here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tier_1_network

    I'd also like to comment that your choice of UK for location is very good for worldwide latency, as the area between UK, France and Netherlands is the central internet backbone location for Europe. Pretty much all connections branch out from that area, particularly London. As an example, here's Level3's network map: http://www.go-networks.net/images/ne...level3_map.gif

    So, recap: Good location choice already, now just make sure the provider you choose has good peering deals so that you get good transfers speeds to worldwide visitors, if that is a concern. Otherwise you'll get burnt when you suddenly realize that your American visitors have incredibly slow access to your site. ;-)
    Last edited by Messajah; 04-19-2011 at 08:09 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    919
    I would recommend www.veloxserv.co.uk, I do not know if they have SSDs but you can ask about them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,429
    Hi

    Look at racksrv they are UK based and have a good reputation.

    http://www.racksrv.com/

    Good luck.

    Andrew

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WebHostingTalk
    Posts
    16,966
    You can also check sigmaweb.gr .
    Specially 4 You
    .
    JoneSolutions.Com ( Jones.Solutions ) is on the net 24/7 providing stable and reliable web hosting solutions and services since 2001

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Messajah View Post
    I'll just throw in that you don't just look at hardware specs and bandwidth allowance. You also need to make sure the host has good peering so that you actually *get* the speed you want to your worldwide users. For instance, let's use your prior host OVH as an example. For transmissions that go outside Europes, OVH has an absolutely terrible lack of good peering deals, meaning that traffic to the U.S, Middle East and Asia goes over slow, shared 10mbit transit lines (if I remember their speed correctly). This has been claimed as one of the reasons that OVH doesn't accept customers from outside a few select European countries.
    Think you got it a bit backwards - high bandwidth peering is very (very) cheap, carrying traffic globally not so much.

    If memory serves this is how OVH is set up, their cost systems are based on a big chunk of their traffic going through peering - which if your traffic going to ISPs they're peered with it's not a bad thing.

    The question with OVH really is if they're strangling the life out of their connections to carriers like l3, glbx et al.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,765
    I'm sure most UK hosts can accomodate you. Have you checked the offers forum? Do you have a specific budget in mind?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    597
    Quote Originally Posted by streaky81 View Post
    Think you got it a bit backwards - high bandwidth peering is very (very) cheap, carrying traffic globally not so much.

    If memory serves this is how OVH is set up, their cost systems are based on a big chunk of their traffic going through peering - which if your traffic going to ISPs they're peered with it's not a bad thing.

    The question with OVH really is if they're strangling the life out of their connections to carriers like l3, glbx et al.
    To be honest I think you can safely ignore everything Messajah said. It is all either inaccurate or just pain wrong.

    You could try coreix (higher end) or redstation (lower end imo). Redstation also price match - although probably not ovh offers.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    London, United Kingdom
    Posts
    857
    Sorry if some how missed this question/answer but do you have a budget in mind? or does it not matter?

    eUKHost are pretty good overall, and I think they have a basic backup solution included.

    Make sure to contact each company you find as you may get a better deal through a salesmen

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    2,762
    From what you referring to, I am guessing that you need a Managed Server. That's gonna be kinda steep in the pricing area. Then again since you are stating almost everything except the price, then I guess you have no problem with that too.
    Aaron Ong
    Dedicated Servers - 100TB Servers - 100Mbps Unmetered Servers - Web Hosting - CDN Network
    Servers in Central, East/West Coast USA, EUROPE and ASIA
    Welltodo Century
    - www.welltodocentury.com

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by topgun View Post
    To be honest I think you can safely ignore everything Messajah said. It is all either inaccurate or just pain wrong.
    Rgr that, looked wrong so felt like somebody had to say something

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    54
    Check out http://real-hosts.co.uk/ Good support, and good guys.
    Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning. - Bill Gates

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wolverhampton & London
    Posts
    209
    @skywin thank you for the recommendation!

    SSD wouldn't be a problem - how much backup space would you require?
    Last edited by CraigMesser; 04-19-2011 at 06:50 PM.
    Craig Messer - www.veloxserv.co.uk
    VeloxServ Communications Ltd - Company Number: 07357707 | VAT Number: GB 119 7652 89
    UK Dedicated Servers, Colocation, Rackspace, Web Hosting & Managed Services
    Wolverhampton and London UK

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    610
    Price is not an issue, checking out the recommendations so far thanks guys.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Kent, UK
    Posts
    419
    A ball park figure would certainly be helpfull as your requirements are definitely doable although without your budget there's no way to tell...
    RackSRV Communications Limited
    UK specialists in Dedicated Servers & Server Colocation
    Company: 06856870 VAT: GB 934 7073 15 Tel: 0330 229 1000

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by streaky81 View Post
    Think you got it a bit backwards - high bandwidth peering is very (very) cheap, carrying traffic globally not so much.

    If memory serves this is how OVH is set up, their cost systems are based on a big chunk of their traffic going through peering - which if your traffic going to ISPs they're peered with it's not a bad thing.

    The question with OVH really is if they're strangling the life out of their connections to carriers like l3, glbx et al.
    Quote Originally Posted by topgun View Post
    To be honest I think you can safely ignore everything Messajah said. It is all either inaccurate or just pain wrong.
    Now I have to take time out of my day to explain this to you... great. Thanks for that.

    Direct Peering = direct connections between various networks = high speed connections (such as the full 1Gbit), as each network hooks up to each other and will deliver your traffic at full speed (sometimes capped per-server in the data center though but still better than transit); it is the practice of exchanging free network access with another network provider so that data can flow freely between the two networks, and it reduces the amount of hops (less hops = one of the factors in achieving low latency) and ensures a very high data throughput.

    Transit = shared burden when no direct peering deals exist = saturated *and* speed-capped connections (such as 10Mbit/s), where your host and the person trying to connect to you don't have any direct path through directly peered networks and will instead go over slower, capped transit lines using a system of having the shared transit lines and paying whichever networks ended up carrying the traffic to its destination (which can actually cost your host far more than peering since the costs are high and the bandwidth is always capped; whereas the cost of direct peering is just the fixed cost of equipment and cables). Whenever transit costs back/forth between two networks exceed the cost of equipment for making a direct connection between those networks, they will typically try to get a peering deal going and hook up to each other's networks directly.

    Hosts that have direct deals with top-level AS's, such as Level3, will guarantee you Direct Peering routes (rather than transit deals) to the majority of people accessing your site, at least the ones on good ISPs that will in turn have peering deals of their own with Level3 etc. This means that your customers can draw data from your servers at high rates and with low latency. Host -> Level 3 <- ISP (Customer). That's the reason to make sure your data center has deals with plenty of top-level AS's to make sure there's a good, direct peering route (instead of transit) between your server and the customer for the largest amount of customers possible.

    So how does that tie into your host?

    Your host's servers sit in a data center. This data center is hooked up to one or more ISPs which in turn are hooked up to various AS's such as Level3; if it's a big data center it may even be an ISP of its own and directly hook into AS's. The better your AS's, the better network your data will travel on (far better than transit routing). This leads to broader geographical reach, higher the speeds internationally, etcetera. With bad AS deals (such as poor ones, or not buying enough lines/bandwidth from each AS to cover the load of all servers in the data center), your data often ends up traveling over a lot of transit lines, which are budget connections that ensure that data can always reach its destination even though your host lacks a top-level partner to carry the data there. These "transit" lines are capped at rates such as 10mbit/sec and shared. The result is that your data travels at low speeds and with loads of jumps (therefore high latency AND low speeds). The other thing to watch out for is, as already mentioned, a data center that might have only bought 1Gbit from Level3 and is already saturating it beyond acceptable with all the servers in the data center, as that too will lead to low bandwidth (but at least latency will probably be good since at least it won't travel over transit routes).

    The more Tier 1 AS's you are connected to, the better your access to and from all of the world.

    Read these articles if you want to know more, as I only wrote this explanation hastily to save myself at least *some* of the time I'm wasting by having to explain this:
    http://arstechnica.com/old/content/2...nd-transit.ars
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peering

    Check with your host or data-center to find out what type of network peering deals they have and the bandwidth caps, as it will widely differ. Good ones typically proudly advertise their peering whereas poor ones won't even talk about it. Junk data-centers will have poor peering and low bandwidth. Top-class data-centers will have great peering and bandwidth and are the only ones suitable if you're looking to serve the whole world from a single location.

    And finally, my other point was about it being beneficial to be in the France/Netherlands/England area (specifically London) if you want low latency to international visitors. I don't know if anyone is actually debating me on that fact, but I'll quickly clarify it: London is a large European hub for the underwater international fiber lines traveling to Asia and America. The closer your data center is to this location, the less hops you'll have to do to reach the international fiber line. A data center in London which buys access to Level3's facilities right at the nexus, will have a very short router trip from the data center to reach the London nexus and carry on out into the world. On the other hand, a data center in Finland would have to travel through multiple routers in large portions of Scandinavia before it reaches the international underwater fiber.

    London is not the only location close to the underwater fiber connection points, obviously, but it's one of the best locations in Europe.

    Edit: Wait a minute, re-reading the first post quoted above turns out we were talking about the exact same thing, oh damnit! Yes, direct peering is cheap after the initial investment in equipment and cabling (or buying access to cables from another company that's already planted them). If your data center lacks good deals with top-level AS's like Level3, then you end up going over Transit lines. If your data center has SATURATED their connections to Level3 etc, then that's another reason for low bandwidth. So we were speaking of the *exact* same thing after all!

    The bottom line is: A solid network in the form of good, high-bandwidth deals with top-level AS's like Level3, in a good location (low amount of hops), is far more important than anything else when it comes to giving all your worldwide visitors a good, speedy experience.
    Last edited by Messajah; 04-22-2011 at 02:37 PM.

  17. #17
    Yes, lol.


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    597
    Hang on 'Messiah', isn't Good Friday supposed to be your day off?

    It would be ironic if he really IS Jesus re-incarnate lol. Just like Jesus..

    - He thinks he's God.
    - Talks a load of BS that no one wants to hear.
    - Turning water into wine and ****.
    - Telling everyone how great Level 3 is.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by xDesign365 View Post
    Price is not an issue, checking out the recommendations so far thanks guys.
    You didn't mention whether you need a managed or unmanaged server...

  20. #20

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by topgun View Post
    Hang on 'Messiah', isn't Good Friday supposed to be your day off?

    It would be ironic if he really IS Jesus re-incarnate lol. Just like Jesus..

    - He thinks he's God.
    - Talks a load of BS that no one wants to hear.
    - Turning water into wine and ****.
    - Telling everyone how great Level 3 is.
    That's right, topgun, and Sunday, which is why it's really impolite that people really ramp up their praying on my day off. Reincarnation takes its toll and I am after all over 2000 years old, so I can't actually be bothered answering prayers anymore (*snickers* as if I ever did anything that couldn't far more logically be attributed to chance...).

    Turning water into wine was a one-off occasion. Nowadays I deal mostly in the "turning people's wine into water to spite them" flavor.

    I also took up an interest in human networking, socialization and friendships, but I misunderstood it and accidentally fell into the arena of digital networking. That is why I am on these boards. As for referring to Level 3 a lot, if you actually knew anything about the internet backbone structure and politics, you would know that there are only a handful of Tier1 AS's and that Level 3 are one of the best at connecting Europe and USA, which is why a deal with them is so important if you want to serve the whole world from one location.

    Off topic: If you want more of my Son of God musings, feel free to friend me (Jesus) on Facebook, it's the least you can do after I died for your sins:
    http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000214896059
    Last edited by Messajah; 04-23-2011 at 08:29 AM.

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