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  1. #1
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    Computer Science VS Information Technology

    What is the difference between the two? I completely don't understand. But anyway, I just enrolled myself in college with course BSCS (BS of Computer Science). I'm hoping to do some programming, developing, and etc related to computers. Thanks for looking.
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  2. #2
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    Computer Science is the the ability to use the basic means of the basic code EVERY computer is built on to read computer Information, binary. This method is used by Intelligence agencies and law enforcements - It can also be known as Computer Interrogation.

    Information Technology is being able to use a computer to enhance a business or at the leisurely use for an individual. Like you are now, you click, drag or type on the screen is what is generated by binary to create pixels which then is compiled into a letter or image for you to see. It is basically being able to use advanced features on a computer but there are many sectors of this particular Sector as A computer is built up of allot of elements and is able to host quite a bit more then what is built into it.

    But because you cant see the binary code, you are unable to manipulate the true elements of a computer. This is what hackers take advantage of that allows them to cause some computers critical damage. Binary is also such a small amount of memory size, it is virtual undetectable if it is being transmitted (over the internet).

    Sorry if this is unreadable, I am in a little of a rush. Hope this helps.
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  3. #3
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    This is a good reference...
    The exact answer depends heavily on the college or university in question, as each tends to split things slightly differently. As a generalization, there are actually three fields commonly associated with computers:

    Information Technology - this sometimes also goes by the names "Information Systems", "Systems Administration", or "Business Systems Information/Administration". This is a practical engineering field, concerned primarily with taking existing hardware and software components and designing a larger system to solve a particular business function. Here you learn about some basic information theory, applied mathematics theory, and things like network topology/design, database design, and the like. IT concerns itself with taking building blocks such as servers, operating systems, network switches, and software applications and creating a whole system to solve a problem (such as creating a sales order handling systems).

    Computer Science - this is a theoretical field, with emphasis on the mathematical basis which underlies modern programming. That is, computer science is primarily software-oriented, as it concerns itself with developing new algorithmic ways to solve a problem. Such algorithms are then actually implemented in software. Here you will learn about the fundamentals of programming languages, a large variety of information theory and algorithm theory (plus, linear and discrete mathematics), how to design a software program, and how to run a successful software development team. CS can also encompass items such as compiler and Operating system design and implementation. In general, if it concerns actually writing any form of software, whether to solve a practical problem or as part of a more academic research project, CS is the place to be.

    Computer Engineering - this is an hardware engineering field. Some places treat it as a specialty of Electrical Engineering. This field teaches the design of hardware components, and also the assembly of those components into a larger hardware system. It encompasses information theory, electrical engineering, VLSI design, and digital logic. Here you will be involved with designing CPUs and other Integrated Chips to perform specific tasks, and will also learn about very low-level programming (usually, the type of programming use to create firmware). In essence, CE involves the creation of hardware devices intended to perform a very specific function (e.g. a modem, a CPU, a DRAM chip, etc.)
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  4. #4
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    If you want a very strong background in fundamental aspects of computing (which can definitely provide a useful understanding), CS is going to be better. A lot of what is taught in IT can be learned in real world experience and is less abstract in nature.
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  5. #5
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    Information technology is CS + electronics and communication

    CS is purely computer language and OS architecture
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  6. #6
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    It's entirely possible to get educated in either of them and still not know anything useful.

    @above, most IT people don't know anything about computer science. I think "IT is CS+whatever" is misleading, in that it sounds like an education in "information technology" is a more comprehensive education.

    It all depends on what you want to do. Like layer0 said, Comp Sci is going to teach you more about the barebones things, but it's entirely possible that almost none of it will translate to your desired real-world job.
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  7. #7
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    Yes, it would be wrong to say that IT encompasses computer science - this isn't really the case. They are quite separate. But I've found that if you pursue computer science you can probably come to understand many of the concepts in IT with ease. The reverse may not be true.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ang C View Post
    I'm hoping to do some programming, developing, and etc related to computers. Thanks for looking.
    You want a CS major definitely.
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  9. #9
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    IT contains= major part(not all) of CS + major part(not all)Communication side of Electronics


    I joined for Electronics, cause I thought CS would be jus computer n wud be boring but still it contained lots of computer topics. It depends on which syllabus you follow!
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  10. #10
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    jwebhost summed up the differences pretty well.

    Given what you want to do, Ang C, Computer Science seems to be the right choice for you.

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  11. #11
    Great summary for you above.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by layer0 View Post
    If you want a very strong background in fundamental aspects of computing (which can definitely provide a useful understanding), CS is going to be better. A lot of what is taught in IT can be learned in real world experience and is less abstract in nature.
    Which is why I am going to get my masters in IT
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougy View Post
    Which is why I am going to get my masters in IT
    Bachelor's in CS, and Master's in IT? Or another route?

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  14. #14
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    Thank you everyone. I'm really glad that I have enrolled myself in college with course BSCS (BS of Computer Science), and that I have made the right decision.
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  15. #15
    I know I am gonna get a lot of hate for saying this, but:

    ICT is for idiots who think they are clever with computers; however don't know that much. It teaches computer basics.

    Computer Science is the study of how computers operate; programming and something that is is above the intelligence level of a high school ICT technician, who gets pwned daily by students who are cleverer than him. Computer scientists should understand the depth of how much knowledge is involved in computers; and just how complicated and interesting the machines are!

    In the computer industry, experience is worth more than education in my opinion.

    It also frustrates me when people say ICT is about the ethics of using computers; when they don't even know anything about philosophy! Grrr.

    Yeah; sorry for the OTT rant!
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJSAHost View Post
    I know I am gonna get a lot of hate for saying this, but:

    ICT is for idiots who think they are clever with computers; however don't know that much. It teaches computer basics.

    Computer Science is the study of how computers operate; programming and something that is is above the intelligence level of a high school ICT technician, who gets pwned daily by students who are cleverer than him. Computer scientists should understand the depth of how much knowledge is involved in computers; and just how complicated and interesting the machines are!

    In the computer industry, experience is worth more than education in my opinion.

    It also frustrates me when people say ICT is about the ethics of using computers; when they don't even know anything about philosophy! Grrr.

    Yeah; sorry for the OTT rant!
    I agree with you for the most part. Computer Science goes into much more depth - completion of such a degree will truly give you an appreciation and depth of understanding for computing that an IT degree simply won't. But you are also correct that experience is going to be a large differentiating factor between people as well. Many good universities line students up with internship programs - the OP should take advantage of this.
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