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  1. #1

    Port speed and public bandwidth?

    I'm confused with this terms that i see when looking at server specs...

    If my public bandwidth is 10Mbps, does it make sense to get 1Gbps or 10Gbps port speed?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinjikenny View Post
    I'm confused with this terms that i see when looking at server specs...

    If my public bandwidth is 10Mbps, does it make sense to get 1Gbps or 10Gbps port speed?
    Essentially it depends on your type of application (streaming, etc). The bigger the port speed the more traffic your server is able to push out at any given time. You should be fine with 10MBPS if you aren't doing too much.

  3. #3
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    I say start off with a 10 Mbps port and upgrade when you need to. Bandwidth graphs will indicate when you need a faster port. A higher speed port can help for traffic spikes but you will run the risk of racking up bandwidth overages. A lower port speed will prevent them and should suffice for most applications.
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  4. #4
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    If your current bandwidth is around 10 Mbit, it might be a good idea to go for a 100 Mbit public connection, so at least you can burst.
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  5. #5
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    If it says public bandwidth is 10Mbps that meant your server (public network) port speed is 10Mbps. If you need more than 10Mbps, you can ask your provider to upgrade to higher port speed.
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  6. #6
    Hi,

    Some hosts also give shared bandwidth. Make sure you take a dedicated one. But I think 100MBPS is better to start with
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  7. #7
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    I agree with Alons.
    100 Mbps is very good for a start. Most customers i've seen do not use more than 100 Mbps even if they rent a dedicated server with 1 Gbps.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by lchan View Post
    I say start off with a 10 Mbps port and upgrade when you need to. Bandwidth graphs will indicate when you need a faster port. A higher speed port can help for traffic spikes but you will run the risk of racking up bandwidth overages. A lower port speed will prevent them and should suffice for most applications.
    Personally 10mbps is too slow for me, we already have DSL and cable speeds at 15mbps and cable modem speed up to 60mbps available.

  9. #9
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    I see tons of people say the above and their servers dont use above 10Mbps.
    You can START with 10Mbps and upgrade later, as upgrading a network port is something very very simple with no downtime and can either be done instantly via automation or manually by support.

  10. #10
    what if i have 10mbps unmetered bandwidth, does that mean i'm capped on 10mbps speed and can't go any faster than that?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by lchan View Post
    I say start off with a 10 Mbps port and upgrade when you need to. Bandwidth graphs will indicate when you need a faster port. A higher speed port can help for traffic spikes but you will run the risk of racking up bandwidth overages. A lower port speed will prevent them and should suffice for most applications.
    Yes and no since most providers do five minute graphs and use counters to figure out the throughput so technically each "line" you see drawn on your bandwidth graph is just a five minute average. So that said, there are times where even if your graph doesn't necessarily show that it is pushing the upper limits, it may. Though if you were doing that all the time then it would obviously show on the graph, so for the most part you would be right.


    Quote Originally Posted by shinjikenny View Post
    what if i have 10mbps unmetered bandwidth, does that mean i'm capped on 10mbps speed and can't go any faster than that?
    Correct, you would be limited to 10Mbps. In cases like that where the company may offer...

    3TB on 100Mbps
    *OR*
    10Mbps unmetered

    I'd say take the first offer(even if you lose technically 300GB) and then cap the bandwidth on eth0.
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  12. #12
    what about this one:

    Dedicated 1 GBPS Enterprise Class Switch $129.00/month
    Cisco 1 GBPS Enterprise Switch $300.00/month
    Upgraded Connection to 1 GigE Switch Port $59.00/month

    if i upgrade my server to those, does that mean i will have burstable 1Gbps bandwidth?

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