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  1. #1
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    Difference in 1Gbps metered or 1Gbps Unmetered?

    Hello,

    Any Speed difference in this bandwidth plan?(Co-location)


    5000GB Bandwidth - 1Gbps
    or
    Unmetered Bandwidth - 1Gbps


    I found this on BurstNet Colocation order page.
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  2. #2
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    1Gbps metered basically means you have 5000GB bandwidth on a 1Gbps port.

    Unmetered bandwidth means you can push as much data as you want, within the 1Gbps port which is up to 324TB per month.

    There's no speed difference between the two, just the bandwidth limit.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by LH-Danny View Post
    1Gbps metered basically means you have 5000GB bandwidth on a 1Gbps port.

    Unmetered bandwidth means you can push as much data as you want, within the 1Gbps port which is up to 324TB per month.

    There's no speed difference between the two, just the bandwidth limit.
    You're right, but I know Burstnet offers shared and dedicated ports so in regards to your last statement he may want clarification.
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  4. #4
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    Deppending on the host you could expect the unmetered port to be on a more congested network.. aka you might not be able to push your 324TB

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mazedk View Post
    Deppending on the host you could expect the unmetered port to be on a more congested network.. aka you might not be able to push your 324TB
    which do you think would be the best choice?
    which would have better speed?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinjikenny View Post
    which do you think would be the best choice?
    which would have better speed?
    Ask the provider.

    To answer your question it really depends what you're doing. If you're going to use 5TB of bandwidth(and expect growth) then the unmetered option is probably best. However if you want something that's uncongested and probably will give you a better speed in the end, based on the assumption that the unmetered gigE is shared amongst many others, then the metered plan may be best. There's just too many variables between both parties to give you the "best" decision.
    Jacob Wall - Steadfast: Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
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  7. #7
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    exactly, if you dont expect to grow beyond 5tb, thats how I would go, some hosts will put traffic from a metered port before traffic from an unmetered one..

  8. #8
    if the provider offers 5TB on a 1Gbps, does that mean I can assume that 324TB/5TB = 644 users will share on that 1Gbps? I heard that providers wants to maximize their profit.

    In a unmetered 1Gbps, how much users can i expect to be sharing on that?

  9. #9
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    That deppends how "greedy" the hosting company is, if they want to make the most money they will add a lot of users and wait untill they get problems from the number of users on a single link. I would think that most would add one or more 10g uplink from their access layer switches to their dist/core, that way they dont kill everyone on the switch if one user is pushing 1g. But they might have budgeted with say 20 or 40 users per gigabit link.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LH-Danny View Post
    1Gbps metered basically means you have 5000GB bandwidth on a 1Gbps port.

    Unmetered bandwidth means you can push as much data as you want, within the 1Gbps port which is up to 324TB per month.

    There's no speed difference between the two, just the bandwidth limit.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Wall View Post
    Ask the provider.

    To answer your question it really depends what you're doing. If you're going to use 5TB of bandwidth(and expect growth) then the unmetered option is probably best. However if you want something that's uncongested and probably will give you a better speed in the end, based on the assumption that the unmetered gigE is shared amongst many others, then the metered plan may be best.
    These statements are pretty accurate, atleast when it comes to our network.
    .
    .
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinjikenny View Post
    if the provider offers 5TB on a 1Gbps, does that mean I can assume that 324TB/5TB = 644 users will share on that 1Gbps? I heard that providers wants to maximize their profit.

    In a unmetered 1Gbps, how much users can i expect to be sharing on that?
    You need to really ask your provider, but any reputable provider would not do that.

    You're bringing up other things too.

    Are they doing layer 2(or is it layer 3?) to aggregate 2 uplinks at the switch level?

    More than likely it's going to just be 24x or 48x sharing 1Gbps or 2Gbps(depending if they're doing aggregate or not).
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  12. #12
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    Some providers even run 10GbE to the switch level, if I'm not wrong SoftLayer does this.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by layer0 View Post
    Some providers even run 10GbE to the switch level, if I'm not wrong SoftLayer does this.
    I'm sure SL does, they have the capacity to do so. I just don't think most places do, although that brings up a great question. To service providers that operate their own network how do you do it? 2x1Gbps in layer 2? 2x1Gbps in layer 3? 10GigE?
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  14. #14
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    If they are offering 1g links one should think 10g (one or more) for 24 or 48 ports would be the way..

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mazedk View Post
    If they are offering 1g links one should think 10g (one or more) for 24 or 48 ports would be the way..
    I do know for a few that's not true. If they're offering unmetered GigE that still may not be the case. It all comes down to money and network capacity. You can't really do that until you've got a good buffer at 20Gbps or 30Gbps worth of connectivity which most places do not have. Unless of course you've got just one cabinet, a 10GigE uplink, and are using a 48 port switch with a 10GigE uplink.
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